31
Jul
15

Bonus Content – Event Garde e-news – August edition

Heidi Letzmann

Heidi Letzmann, education and programs manager, American Association of Law Libraries

Q & A with Heidi Letzmann, education and programs manager, American Association of Law Libraries

Q: If you had to choose another career path, what would it be, and why?
A: My mom always tells me I missed my calling as a meteorologist since I’m endlessly fascinated by the weather.

Q: What movie best sums up your life, and why?
A: Whoa – I’m not prepared to “sum up” my life just yet, but themes of whimsy, courage and destiny really appeal to me in “Amélie,” “Antonia’s Line” and “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.”

Q: If you could spend the day with a famous person, who would it be, and why?
A: It would be wild to spend a day with Dorothy Parker.

Q: Let’s say you had a locket. Whose picture would be in it?
A: Another tough one. Probably why I don’t have a locket.

Q: Are you a night owl or a morning dove?
A: I’m turning into a reluctant morning dove, wishing I could stay up all night, but realizing that I perform better in the morning.

21
Jul
15

10 Networking Apps For Event Attendees

Daniel Mendelson, Bizzabo

Daniel Mendelson, Bizzabo

This month’s guest post is by Daniel Mendelson of Bizzabo. It was originally posted on July 16.

Editor’s Note: By now, you all know I’m a social media/technology addict. So, I was so excited to learn about these apps that I had to share with you! These could help your attendees have a more meaningful networking experience.

According to Mobile Statistics, people spend on average 23 full days a year on their phone. Imagine if only a fraction of that time was spent on networking apps. In this post you will find a list of some great networking apps perfect for event attendees, which will take their networking success to the next level!

  1. Charlie: Have a meeting? Don’t stress! This networking app sends you information on attendees you might meet before the event. You won’t have to remember details about other event attendees because Charlie does all the research and preparation for you.
  2. Bizzabo: Bizzabo’s networking success platform is truly one of a kind. In addition to a total integration with LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, this networking platform allows you to engage in one-on-one messaging with other event attendees in order to help you make the most out of your event networking experience.
  3. Namerick: As featured in BusinessInsider and the Huffington Post, Namerick is a must-have networking app. If you are one of those people who can never seem to remember names, Namerick is for you. Using repetition and mnemonics, Namerick will help you keep track of the names of other attendees you meet at an event.
  4. CamCard: Now you can easily manage and organize the business cards you receive at an event. CamCard extracts relevant contact information from business cards and imports them into your smartphone. The sheer number of business card apps attests to the importance of adding one to your networking app portfolio. Take a look at SamCard, WorldCardMobile and ScanBizCards for some other options.
  5. CityHour: Do you have some downtime at the conference you’re attending? Are you interested in networking right away? CityHour is one of our networking apps mentions because it connects you with those willing to meet within the next two hours, who are within a 50-mile radius of your location and who share a common industry and meeting goal.
  6. inDecision: Can’t decide whether to approach the big-name conference speaker? Every event attendee has to make decisions that can make or break his or her networking success. Through pros and cons lists and organizing your decision options, inDecision can help you make the right networking choice.
  7. Contxts: If you are looking to share and receive contact information in the quickest way possible, this app is for you. Contxts is a tool that helps you connect with other business professionals by streamlining and organizing the exchange of contact information through SMS messaging.
  8. About.me: This networking app gives you the opportunity to tell your professional story and personalize the way you are presented. About.me has detailed statistics on who interacts with your profile. You can use this networking app to track how popular you are among your network.
  9. Switch: We know that many event attendees go to events hoping to find new job opportunities. Switch is a networking app that can help attendees find the perfect job. It connects job seekers with hiring managers – not head hunters or recruiters.
  10. Spotcard: Discover LinkedIn members at the next conference you attend with this efficient networking app. Using your LinkedIn profile and contact information, this app creates a shareable digital card business card that makes your networking connections easier and more meaningful.

 

14
Jul
15

Latest ruling could mean more unpaid internships

free_laborIt’s summer…and that means planning season for many of you. Perhaps that planning includes whether to hire an intern for the upcoming year. And with that comes the question: “Should we pay them?”

In September 2013, I wrote a post about the Black Swan case, in which a federal judge ruled that Fox Searchlight Pictures violated the Fair Labor Standards Act by not paying interns during the production of the 2010 movie “Black Swan.” (It was one of our most popular posts!)

The judge ruled the interns performed the same work duties for which others were paid and the internships didn’t provide an educational environment, but instead benefited the studio.

Now, just two years later, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has thrown a boon to employers – but a blow to interns.

On July 2, it ruled the Federal District Court in the Black Swan case used an incorrect standard – one set by the Department of Labor – to define an internship, declaring that as long as work serves an educational purpose, it can considered an internship – paid or unpaid. Using this test, a person is an employee only if the employer benefits more from the relationship than the intern.

Cutting through the legalese: This could make unpaid internships much easier to justify, and could lead to a surge of them in the workforce.

It’s a touchy conversation among millennials, most of whom expect to get paid for their services. As I wrote in the post two years ago, interns are no longer the “coffee getters” and “copy makers.” Most employers consider interns valuable team members and delegate professional responsibilities to them – many of the same responsibilities for which employees receive compensation.

But the argument remains: Does professional experience outweigh money?

The National Association of Colleges and Employers issued a statement on July 2 in response to the U.S. District Court’s ruling, saying, “At the foundation of such an assessment is the tenet that the internship is a legitimate learning experience benefiting the student and not simply an operational work experience that just happens to be conducted by a student. The core question, according to NACE, is whether or not work performed by an intern will primarily benefit the employer in a way that does not also advance the education of the student.”

Internships-resize200dpi2As further explanation, NACE developed criteria that employers can use to determine which experiences can legitimately be classified as internships:

  • The experience must be an extension of the classroom: a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform.
  • The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings.
  • The experience has a defined beginning and end and a job description with desired qualifications.
  • There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic coursework.
  • There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience.
  • There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor.
  • There are resources, equipment and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals.
  • Unpaid internships in the not-for-profit sector reflect the fiscal realities and limitations for organizations in that sector and are acknowledged accordingly in current Department of Labor guidelines and enforcement practices.
  • All interns, regardless of their compensation, should enjoy similar basic protections in the work setting consistent with all laws, ethical considerations and sound business practices.

At the same time, NACE’s 2015 Internship & Co-op Survey found the current overall average hourly rate for bachelor’s degree-level interns, adjusted for inflation to 2010 levels, is $15.98. In comparison, the average hourly rate for interns was $17 in 2010.

While associations and nonprofits may not be first of mind for interns, they offer valuable experiential learning experiences, wrote Todd Van Deak, president and founder of Philadelphia-based TVD Associates, in an October 2013 Event Garde post.

So it’s important to consider how your organization could enhance interns’ educational experiences.

As a follow up, tell us…do you pay your interns? Why or why not?

07
Jul
15

Selecting and coaching speakers to deliver quality digital presentations

Webinar

This post was originally written by Aaron Wolowiec for the CommPartners blog.

When it comes to identifying topics for face-to-face and digital presentations, there are generally two schools of thought:

Call for presentations; or
Content curation.

In a traditional call for presentations, a general invitation is released to an organization’s key constituents to submit topic ideas for a program. This call provides detailed instructions for submission of papers for assessment and selection by a review committee. Ultimately, constituent submissions are returned to the committee for review, scoring and selection.

In a content curation process, a committee comprised of a cross-section of the organization’s key constituents first identifies the topics of greatest interest or concern to the industry. In some instances, this committee may rely on a content outline such as the one created for the Certified Association Executive (CAE) exam.

If no outline is available, the committee will consider current trends, future trends (five to 10 years or more into the future) and other hot topics likely keeping the industry up at night. Once content is reviewed, ranked and confirmed, the result is a makeshift content outline the committee can use to disseminate speaker asks.

Ultimately, staff inherent speakers from one of these two methods. Via the call for presentations approach, speakers self-represent their content expertise and speaking prowess and are selected accordingly. Via the content curation approach, speaker asks may be more deliberate (e.g., based on credentials or demonstrated know-how); however, they are limited by the committee’s network.

Regardless of the method used, there really is no guarantee speakers will be successful. Your candidate may be an experienced and skilled face-to-face presenter, a 30-year industry veteran and a world-renowned practitioner, but still may not be ready to present utilizing a digital platform.

SpeakerBefore selecting a speaker for your next digital presentation, consider that individual’s digital presentation experience. Additionally, request evaluation data. Where possible, it’s best if the speaker has previously presented (successfully) using the same digital platform you intend to use. Remember, not all digital platforms are created equal.

And regardless of experience, speakers should be open to furthering their presentation skills. Following are 11 challenges and possible solutions you may use to coach your speakers in delivering quality digital presentations. Of course, practice is still the best strategy for mentoring speakers who have no previous digital presentation experience.

Challenge: Attendees seem disconnected from the speaker/learning experience.
Solution: Utilize a webcam to deliver the presentation; care should be taken to look directly into the camera throughout the program.

Challenge: With no facial expressions/body language to draw from, the speaker is uncertain attendees are “getting” the content.
Solution: Consider pausing the presentation periodically to ask an assessment question via the digital platform’s poll function.

Challenge: When joining remotely, participants are constantly distracted by email and other visual cues.
Solution: Set ground rules for participants early in the program and ask attendees to follow along in a pre-printed participant guide where they can complete assignments and take notes.

Challenge: Reflection activities cause a lot of dead space/air time during the program.
Solution: Convert the reflection activity into a pre- or post-program assignment.

Challenge: Practice activities facilitated during face-to-face programs don’t seem to translate into a digital environment.
Solution: Encourage multiple registrants from the same office or gather attendees at centralized locations to participate in the program together; arm them with a supplies list, directions and plenty of activity time.

Challenge: Four or more hours of content may be required to teach a particular skill.
Solution: Segment and sequence content into smaller modules. No more than 60 minutes is suggested, though even shorter is preferred.

Challenge: Learners want to share their experiences, but this is difficult to facilitate when all of the lines are muted for optimal sound quality.
Solution: Allow attendees to demonstrate their interest in speaking and then open up only their phone lines. Alternatively, gather attendee stories in advance of the program and have the moderator read them aloud.

Challenge: Participants are easily bored by digital presentations.
Solution: Incorporate different instructional strategies into the program beyond lecture (e.g., video, poll, chat).

Challenge: The chat function is difficult to moderate so it often goes unused/is turned off.
Solution: Participants crave interaction with their peers. They also learn a lot from these conversations. Utilize a separate chat moderator who can prompt discussion with attendees, respond to questions and pose trending questions to the speaker.

Challenge: The digital platform makes it difficult for the speaker to provide personalized attendee feedback.
Solution: Allow participants the opportunity within 30 days to follow-up with the speaker directly (e.g., ask a question, gain clarification).

Challenge: It’s challenging to ensure retention and job transfer post-program.
Solution: Encourage action planning to focus learner ideas and next steps; create a job aid to guide future performance; or schedule post-session touch points (e.g., 30, 60 and 90 days).

30
Jun
15

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news – July edition

Allison McClintick

Allison McClintick, CEO/leader development specialist, FlightLead Consulting

Q & A with Allison McClintick, CEO/leader development specialist, FlightLead Consulting

Q: Would you rather sky dive, bungee jump or climb to the top of the Golden Gate Bridge, and why?
A: If the goal is to put myself into cardiac arrest, I would say all three! All those choices seem equally terrifying because I am totally not OK with being in the air like that! I would rather check out all the sacred Native American sites in America or camp in Yellowstone or tour all of America’s national parks! When it comes to adventure, I am a “feet on the ground” girl!

Q: It’s almost 4th of July! Which type of firework best represents your life?
A: I am split on this one. A very real part of me would be best represented by an M-80 – you know the ones that just go off and sound like a bomb? I can be very aggressive, loud and startling! The other part of me would love to be represented by a colorful sparkler – long-lasting, non-threatening and fun to hold and run around with!

Q: If you could live your life as an animal, what would you be, and why?
A: I would be very curious to live out my life as a dolphin. These animals are wicked smart and I feel there is a whole world of mystery and magic down there that we don’t know about. Their language is so complex – scientists say they may have even more evolved intuition and emotional intelligence than humans. That would be incredible! And because I feel like two totally different people in my life, I would not hate being on a wild horse in the 1800s Wild West. How amazing would that be?

Q: Again… it’s almost a holiday, so what’s your favorite picnic food?
A: The only reason why I don’t eat certain picnic foods is because they are usually awful for you. But everyone knows that calories don’t count on a holiday, so bring it!

Q: If I were writing a book about your life, what would the title be, and why?
A: Oh, this is easy. “Rebel With a Cause.” I am a serious pain in the neck. I have never done things the way people expect; I have always fought against conformity in its many manifestations; and I feel pretty comfortable with what I was put here to do. I don’t intentionally set out to be a rebel, but it has always worked out that way! Only took me 39 years to figure out how to make it work out for me!




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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