Posts Tagged ‘Twitter

09
Aug
16

Big city love from ASAE

attendees6Good news fellow Midwesterners!

In 2018, ASAE’s Annual Meeting and Exposition will be coming to Chicago!

On July 25, ASAE announced the host cities for its meetings, through 2022:

2017 – Toronto
2018 – Chicago
2019 – Columbus
2020 – Las Vegas
2021 – Dallas
2022 – Atlanta

“Congratulations to the cities selected for our 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 and 2022 ASAE annual meetings and expositions,” said John Graham, ASAE president and CEO. “We had seven cities that were finalists in our selection process, and each one did a fantastic job. The proposals submitted by the winning cities exceeded our expectations. Looking forward to growing our partnerships with the respective convention and visitors bureaus in the coming years as we plan exciting and engaging meetings.”

ASAE last held its annual meeting in Chicago in 2007, which had the highest attendance of association executives. In 2019, it will be the first time Columbus has hosted an ASAE Annual Meeting & Exposition.

attendees11And, it’s hard to believe, but the 2016 ASAE Annual Meeting is next week, Aug. 13-16, in Salt Lake City, offering a versatile lineup of sessions and inspiring keynotes. New this year, ASAE is offering learning formats from which to choose.

I’m guessing there will be avid social media engagement, especially on Twitter using #ASAE16 and @ASAEAnnual. In fact, I’ll be following the stream, searching for future blog post topics and future guest bloggers. So please follow me on Twitter and don’t be afraid to tag me!

Is it your first time? Check out these tips from ASAE. And remember to use #newbie on your tweets.

At the same time, download the ASAE Programs App to help you connect with your network, keep track of your schedule and engage on social media.

And finally – have fun! I’ve been to Salt Lake and it’s a gorgeous city with some must-try eating hotspots. We’ve heard about how much revenue events such as Super Bowls and presidential debates generate for cities, think about how excited Salt Lake is to welcome you! Share some Twitter love.

I look forward to communicating with you next week!

10
May
16

Building community with a click

communityOne of the best benefits of attending professional events is networking – whether face to face or via social media.

And it often starts before an event. Personally, before I attend a conference, I search Twitter for the event’s hashtag to engage in conversation and “meet” colleagues.

That said, searching Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn can be time consuming and overwhelming.

But event apps can help, according to a new e-book by DoubleDutch.

“It’s time to make use of innovative technology to enhance face-to-face connections, redefine engagement, keep the conversation alive, inform better content, build more robust social media communities and ultimately demonstrate the ROI of event marketing,” DoubleDutch says. “An event app provides community managers countless opportunities to build an audience before the event, engage during and keep engagement thriving long after the event has come to an end.”

Nearly all event marketers – 88 percent – use social media to create event hype. This means more than just promoting products and services; it means fostering conversation and building a community.

Event apps allow attendees to check in to events and post status updates. In other words, an event app mirrors an event-specific social networking platform. At the same time, apps allow event planners to gather and analyze data. In addition, by engaging in conversation, speakers can tailor presentations to address specific questions and concerns – thereby boosting ROI for event participants.

ts_140501_smartphone_apps_800x600

DoubleDutch has a few suggestions:

  • A welcome video from a CEO/chairperson
  • Interactive case studies in the form of Q & As
  • Access to presentations and other content
  • Live polls and audience surveys
  • Exclusive deals and promotions
  • Exhibitor giveaways

During a program, an event planner should:

  • Assign an app champion – Appoint a staff person to visit sessions and walk the exhibition floor to identify hot spots and key takeaways to share with attendees.
  • Stay in control – Sometimes things happen (room changes, session cancellations) and an app allows event planners to communicate quickly with attendees. At the same time, by following in-app conversations, event planners can nip a potential issue in the bud.
  • Share in real time – Build a crowd-sourced multi-media library in which participants can post resources and photos – both during and after the event.
  • Elevate key influencers – Find active app users and promote their posts. Call them out and show your appreciation. Encourage app users to sync apps with their social media profiles to maximize engagement.

In short, event apps allow attendees to learn from others; network before, during and after an event; and transfer their knowledge to their teams long after an event ends.

“Event marketing is crucial for forming connections with customers and sponsors, growing your digital community and building brand sentiment,” DoubleDutch says. “It is an opportunity to amplify engaged communities around your brand, product or service. Social media grows and engages those connections, but even the most adept community manager can’t attain the best event results through social media alone.”

26
Apr
16

Some must-dos for ASAE’s annual meeting

 

Aplebaum pic

Lowell Aplebaum

In anticipation of the ASAE Annual Meeting and Exposition, which will be held Aug. 13-16 in Salt Lake City, Utah, we’ll be providing some tips on how to maximize your experience.

 

 

To start us off, Lowell Aplebaum shares his advice. Follow him on Twitter at @LowellMatthew.

 

Do you have some tips to share? Email Kristen Parker at Kristen@eventgarde.com.

 

 

  1. For each session time slot, map out a first and second session choice. It is very acceptable at ASAE to switch sessions if the content or format doesn’t accommodate your learning style. Having a second choice in your back pocket can make this easier.
  2. A few weeks before, start following the conference hashtag on Twitter (#asae16). You will see a stream of information about sessions, receptions, etc.  Better yet, you will start to virtually “meet” some of people who will be there. I actually found the colleague who eventually became my CAE study buddy by first connecting on a Twitter chat!
  1. Registration opens at 7 a.m. on Saturday so make sure you get there early rather than waiting until Sunday.
  2. Check out the Hive/New Bee Lounge. Though they shift the name sometimes, this lounge will have a new “bee” sticker (yes, it is a bee) that is unobtrusive on your badge, but a good wink to other newbies too.
  3. Make sure you arrive in time for Opening Reception, which will be held at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Everyone flows differently – some like to show up and just play pinball, bouncing from new person to new person. Others feel more confident when networking with a buddy or even a small group. Think about how you best meet people and try to set yourself up for networking success before you even step in the room.
  4. giveGetOpening Keynote (or any of them) – Move up! The back may fill up more quickly, but that isn’t because that’s where the best seats are located. Want to see and hear better? Sit near the front.
  5. Session selection – Think of the individual sessions you attend as a “choose your own adventure.” Did you just meet someone and are having a really interesting conversation? Pivot, go to a session together and see how you can help each other learn. If you’re following the conference Twitter stream and hear some interesting buzz about a session, attend. Ultimately, you might want a mix of sessions. And don’t count on outlets. Most session rooms won’t have many outlets, if any at all. Those that do will quickly be in use by those who show up to session early. Think about your charging needs and carry a backup battery for your phone just in case.
  6. Attend a Community Section Reception on Sunday. The YP one is a great place to start, though any of these are open and offer smaller networking opportunities to meet new colleagues.
  7. The Expo Hall is a place to secure new vendor relationships and also to see what’s on the horizon for association tools, resources, partners and locations. If you aren’t coming with direct business to do, still walk the hall, using it as a learning experience. Expo Hall hours throughout two days are long. If you find you have exhausted the floor, that’s the perfect time to check out some of the lounges that are available. At a minimum, the ASAE Foundation lounge the past few years has sponsored Chuck Fazio’s Headshot Lounge where you can get free professional headshots. Also, the lounge hosting the ASAE Career HQ is good to check out (or even see if they have a really low-price career coaching session available).
  8. Non-ASAE Sponsored Receptions – By the time you get to Sunday night, you will have met a few people so ask where they are going and join in! Remember – It isn’t about how many receptions you attend, but about what you do with the time you spend at each. If the people attending resonate with where you are/what you’re looking for, stay and talk.
  9. Awards & Recognition Breakfast – This optional event on Monday morning is early. With that said, do you want inspiration and vision for the future of our industry? Come see our next leaders.
  10. ASAE Foundation – The ASAE Foundation is our industry’s entity, supporting our field with research, innovation grants and investments in the future of associations. There is a foundation donor reception on Saturday evening before the opening reception for those who make a certain level donation. Besides investing in your profession, this reception is smaller than the opening and filled with others that have taken that next step to invest in the association field as well. It’s a worthwhile way to get your feet wet at your first conference.
09
Feb
16

Coming soon to association learning: gamified learning and microcredentials

Jeff Cobb and Celisa Steele

Jeff Cobb and Celisa Steele, co-founders of Tagoras

Tagoras recently released its much-anticipated 2016 Association Learning + Technology Report, which contains a wealth of information about associations’ efforts to incorporate technology into their educational programs and platforms.

We know the educational landscape is changing as associations adapt to their members’ learning needs and habits. In fact, almost 90 percent of the nearly 200 associations that responded to Tagoras’ survey reported offering technology-enabled or technology-enhanced education for their members.

How?

Webinars continue to be the No. 1 technological learning tool, followed by online learning programs, such as tutorials or presentations.

But some new types of learning are also emerging: massive open online courses, flipped classes, gamified learning, microcredentials and microlearning, which has the highest rate of adoption.

Other key takeaways from the report:

  • Social media – Not surprisingly, associations use YouTube for education. But Twitter ranks a close second followed by LinkedIn and Facebook.
  • Mobile learning – About 41 percent of associations that use technology for learning provide a mobile version of their content. In addition, in the next year, 26 percent plan to go mobile.
  • Live streaming – Not many associations offer virtual conferences, but instead nearly 30 percent said they live stream events.
  • Learning Management Systems – A LMS is the second most popular technology platform. In fact, the percentage of LMS users increased from 51 percent in 2013 to 60 percent in 2015.
  • Data – Despite a growing use in technology, less than one-fifth of respondents said they always use data to decide which learning platforms to use for future educational opportunities.
  • Instructional design – More than 50 percent of associations employ instructional designers.
  • Chief Learning Officer – About 40 percent of respondents said someone within their organization holds a title that incorporates the word “learning.”
  • Knowledge transfer – More than 30 percent of associations reported using technology to sustain learning after the completion of an educational product or service.
  • Credentialing – Across the board, credentialing is becoming increasingly important for education. In fact, 68 percent of associations provide education to support a credential required in their field.

internet-315799_1280Blending technology and learning seems to make business sense for associations. More than half of those surveyed have seen an increase in revenue from their educational offerings. In addition, the associations that employ a Chief Learning Officer, or someone with a similar title, net more revenue from their educational offerings than those that don’t. Read: Credibility counts.

All this said, cost is still a top concern among associations. Just more than 50 percent of respondents said they’re satisfied with the cost of creating educational offerings and the cost of employing staff to develop and execute them.

Somewhat disappointing: Only 18 percent of associations that use technology think they’re successful.

“Technology has changed learning irrevocably, and the rate of change isn’t likely to slow,” Tagoras said. “This creates a clear opportunity for technology to transition into a more significant, more strategic part of the mix of education and professional development associations provide to members.”

As this happens, Tagoras predicts:

  • Growth in implementation of learning platforms and their integration with other key systems, like association management systems
  • A continued focus on professional instructional design to help ensure educational products are effective
  • An increase in competition that will, in turn, drive experimentation as associations look at how best to deliver more value
  • The professionalization of the education function overall and the growth of roles like chief learning officer

Aligning with Event Garde’s tagline, Learn.Network.Transfer, look for blog posts throughout the next few months that break down specific elements of Tagoras’ report.

13
Oct
15

Small but mighty meetings

cwmeeting1.jpg.441x331_defaultThink back to your college days. Remember those massively packed, overwhelming lecture halls? Was it hard to pay attention? Did you feel like a minnow in a sea of students swimming upstream?

I did.

Then, think back to your smaller classes (even if that only happened in high school). Wasn’t it easier to focus? Didn’t you feel a bit more important when the professor/teacher actually saw your hand…and called on you?

Now apply those same scenarios to the workplace. How much do you really get done in hugely packed meeting rooms?

When it comes to strategy and long-term planning, small groups are much more effective. Confidence is higher. Communication flows.

And so, it makes sense that in a recent Successful Meetings survey on small meeting trends for this year, event professionals ranked strategizing as the best goal for small meetings. Training came in a close second and team building took the No. 3 spot.

Also in the survey, Successful Meetings members viewed meetings with 25 people or fewer as “small meetings.”

As for location? A city center took the top spot. Think place-based education, yes? Hosting small meetings allow organizations to showcase local hot spots – and yes, even a favorite eatery works. But resort and hotels nearly tied for second and third place favorites.

However, surprisingly, 46 percent of respondents indicated they don’t use social media for small meetings. Perhaps that’s because face-to-face interaction is conducive to small settings, but it seems social media should have a presence, regardless of size. At the same time, 70 percent of survey participants indicated they don’t offer online components.

That said, of those who indicated they employ social media for small meetings, Facebook was the most common platform. Members ranked LinkedIn and Twitter as second and third.

The biggest challenge to small meetings planning? Room negotiation rates. Finding available dates presents the second largest challenge, followed by securing suitable function space onsite.

So what do you think? What trends do you predict for small meetings in 2016?

21
Jul
15

10 Networking Apps For Event Attendees

Daniel Mendelson, Bizzabo

Daniel Mendelson, Bizzabo

This month’s guest post is by Daniel Mendelson of Bizzabo. It was originally posted on July 16.

Editor’s Note: By now, you all know I’m a social media/technology addict. So, I was so excited to learn about these apps that I had to share with you! These could help your attendees have a more meaningful networking experience.

According to Mobile Statistics, people spend on average 23 full days a year on their phone. Imagine if only a fraction of that time was spent on networking apps. In this post you will find a list of some great networking apps perfect for event attendees, which will take their networking success to the next level!

  1. Charlie: Have a meeting? Don’t stress! This networking app sends you information on attendees you might meet before the event. You won’t have to remember details about other event attendees because Charlie does all the research and preparation for you.
  2. Bizzabo: Bizzabo’s networking success platform is truly one of a kind. In addition to a total integration with LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter, this networking platform allows you to engage in one-on-one messaging with other event attendees in order to help you make the most out of your event networking experience.
  3. Namerick: As featured in BusinessInsider and the Huffington Post, Namerick is a must-have networking app. If you are one of those people who can never seem to remember names, Namerick is for you. Using repetition and mnemonics, Namerick will help you keep track of the names of other attendees you meet at an event.
  4. CamCard: Now you can easily manage and organize the business cards you receive at an event. CamCard extracts relevant contact information from business cards and imports them into your smartphone. The sheer number of business card apps attests to the importance of adding one to your networking app portfolio. Take a look at SamCard, WorldCardMobile and ScanBizCards for some other options.
  5. CityHour: Do you have some downtime at the conference you’re attending? Are you interested in networking right away? CityHour is one of our networking apps mentions because it connects you with those willing to meet within the next two hours, who are within a 50-mile radius of your location and who share a common industry and meeting goal.
  6. inDecision: Can’t decide whether to approach the big-name conference speaker? Every event attendee has to make decisions that can make or break his or her networking success. Through pros and cons lists and organizing your decision options, inDecision can help you make the right networking choice.
  7. Contxts: If you are looking to share and receive contact information in the quickest way possible, this app is for you. Contxts is a tool that helps you connect with other business professionals by streamlining and organizing the exchange of contact information through SMS messaging.
  8. About.me: This networking app gives you the opportunity to tell your professional story and personalize the way you are presented. About.me has detailed statistics on who interacts with your profile. You can use this networking app to track how popular you are among your network.
  9. Switch: We know that many event attendees go to events hoping to find new job opportunities. Switch is a networking app that can help attendees find the perfect job. It connects job seekers with hiring managers – not head hunters or recruiters.
  10. Spotcard: Discover LinkedIn members at the next conference you attend with this efficient networking app. Using your LinkedIn profile and contact information, this app creates a shareable digital card business card that makes your networking connections easier and more meaningful.

 

07
Apr
15

Social butterflies may learn the most

social_mediaMaybe one of the reasons I love Pinterest so much is that I’ve learned how to use basic household substances to remove stains; how to make cute Thanksgiving pinecone turkeys; how to make pasta from squash; and the list goes on and on.

In other words, I’ve admittedly expanded my horizons with social media.

By now, you know I’m an avid user of Facebook and Twitter, partly because I realize the potential of social media to educate. Yep, I said it: It’s possible to learn from social media.

In fact, the term is “social learning,” and associations are slowly embracing it as part of their learning efforts.

Last April, consulting firm Tagoras conducted an informal survey about associations’ use of social technologies for learning products and/or services, and shortly thereafter released a whitepaper on the topic.

Social technologies are defined as any technology that allows users to communicate with each other via the Internet or cellular networks to share videos, graphics, etc. Examples: blogs, discussion boards, social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn), YouTube and podcasts.

Of the 102 respondents, more than half reported they use social technologies for learning, with 25 percent indicating plans to do so within the year. Not surprisingly, YouTube ranked No. 1, followed by discussion forums and Twitter. Facebook and LinkedIn, thanks to their discussion capabilities, were also popular.

In addition, a placed-based annual meeting of members was the No. 1 type of learning product associated with social technologies.

So why should associations adopt social learning, according to Tagoras?

  • It’s a natural fit. Associations are social in nature, striving to connect people with similar wants and needs. So social tools – for which there are groups, pages and forums to bring together passions – simply make sense.
  • Social learning boosts retention. Discussion forums allow users to learn from each other by asking questions, sharing ideas and reinforcing concepts from classes, while also fostering the building of networks.
  • It’s ongoing. Often, learners attend a class and after it’s over never revisit the knowledge they gained. But by using a blog or WiKi, users can revisit archived topics anytime.
  • Social learning is motivational. It’s exciting to see classmates, colleagues and peers succeed and social media and social technologies make it easy to share such news.

social-learning_smallThe Tagoras whitepaper cites several examples of associations that have successfully used social learning. But in short: Twitter chats; Facebook discussions in which people answer a question or respond to a comment and to each other; and live-tweeting during a conference.

If participation is a concern, associations can require members to participate in weekly discussion forums, contribute blog posts and participate in Twitter chats or Google hangouts.

All this said, the Tagoras survey found most associations don’t have a social learning strategy in place. At the same time, respondents indicated lack of resources and budget as top barriers for dabbling in social media. And some associations fear their staff isn’t skilled enough to successfully engage in social learning.

Nevertheless, efforts don’t have to be expensive or complicated, Tagoras says.

“Given that social learning is effective, why not try it, if you’re not already?” it wrote. “To our minds, the case for social learning is made, and the question at hand is not whether to make use of it but how to incorporate it as effectively, as strategically as possible.”




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 5,282 other followers

Facebook updates

Twitter Updates

Featured in Alltop

%d bloggers like this: