Posts Tagged ‘employees

08
Nov
16

No more learning silos

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Photo courtesy of Skillsoft via Facebook

I’m a self-professed word nerd. In college, I loved leaving classes with a new nugget of information. And now that I’m a working professional, I get giddy at the thought of attending conferences.

 

And, even better: My employers not only encourage professional development, but expect it.

Why? Because they know educated employees drive success.

According to Kieran King, vice president, global customer insight, at Skillsoft, currently there’s a “war for talent.” And many HR departments are losing.

Some HR departments have been pretty lax in encouraging professional development and education, because, quite frankly, it wasn’t deemed important. But with workplace dynamics changing and younger, better-educated professionals coming on board, that’s no longer the case.

“The demographic shifts, revamped business models, digitization of products, rise in big data analytics and new forms of competition require organizations to fuel perpetual skill upgrades,” King said in her new whitepaper. “HR must evolve to apply new paradigms toward talent attraction, mine for unrealized capability, build rapid development tactics, implement highly effective engagement strategies and unveil succession pathways with far more innovation than they have demonstrated to date. Old assumptions and stale practices need to be abandoned. Organizations that successfully compete for talent will exploit technology to achieve a smarter way, build a healthier culture and develop a more resilient workforce.”

How?

Break down the silos between talent management and learning.

Training employees, especially with an event-centric approach, isn’t enough, King said. Instead, companies should create an environment that fosters learning and employee development. It’s about much more than setting up educational programming in an LMS and conducting performance reviews. It requires HR to adapt new roles.

kieran-king

Kieran King

“Achieving this type of symbiotic relationship between talent and learning not only dissolves silos, it also creates competitive differentiation,” King said. “Organizations that apply this modern approach build superior employer brands, entice a higher level of talent to join their ranks and optimize the existing workforce in new ways.”

 

Enter a self-developing organization.

A self-developing organization allows individuals to control their own personal development and career trajectories, King explains. This involves making information available and actionable and connecting employees with the appropriate resources.

And it starts with the top. Leaders of self-developing organizations establish and monitor goals and stay abreast of industry trends and opportunities, passing that knowledge on to their staff.

However, King said, that’s only possible by leveraging smart technology – technology that customizes individual employee needs and delivers recommendations.

In short, in a self-developing organization:

  • Learning and talent management efforts and technologies should be coupled together.
  • High-quality, curated content delivered in the context of job performance is essential.
  • Fluid talent mobility is key to keeping employees engaged and it is a competitive lever.
  • Ubiquitous access to learning – delivery at the time and place of need – is critical to knowledge acceleration.
  • The user experience must be frictionless and compelling.
  • Technology provides the ability to manage talent and deliver learning in innovative ways.
  • The power of analytics provides insights that can predict demand and serve-up hyper-personalized experiences.

“Organizations that apply higher levels of talent and learning maturity will be better able to respond to business change and will be better positioned to innovate,” King said. “Their HR direction is highly purpose-driven, with clear objectives and multi-faceted strategy. They will be undoubtedly more successful in handling dynamics that will affect adaptation and ultimately, organizational competitiveness.”

Do you have questions for Kieran King? Connect with her on Twitter.

27
Sep
16

What is Your Volunteer Culture?

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Jamie Notter, founding partner, WorkXO

This month’s guest blog post is by Jamie Notter, founding partner, WorkXO

I think a lot of associations have a love/hate relationship with their volunteers. At one level, these folks do a LOT of work — for free — so their contributions are highly valued. We couldn’t accomplish what we do, given our resources, without these members moving the ball forward for us. And on top of that, we are membership organizations, so it’s the members who should really be driving things. These members ARE the association, right?

But there is also the shadow side of volunteers. You know, the ones who push too hard for their own personal agenda or are willing to reverse an entire strategic direction that was set by the leadership simply because they have a different view. These are the volunteers who drive us crazy, but we tend to throw up our hands about it, going back to that conclusion above: It’s THEIR association, so what can we do?

Well, it turns out there’s a lot you can do. Just because volunteers don’t get paid (therefore you can’t really fire them), does NOT mean  they are not subject to one of the most powerful forces you have at your disposal as an organizational leader: organizational culture.

Yes, there is a culture for volunteers. There are expectations about how things get done, and every volunteer has an experience of what it’s like to get things done at your association. They know how agile you are, how much collaboration is valued, how much you rely on technology and what level of transparency is expected from them. Even though they can’t get fired (unless they do something really horrible), the existing culture actually drives their behavior, so if you want different behavior, you need to shift the culture first. So here’s the big problem: We don’t set the culture for volunteers; we let them do that. After all, it’s “their” association.

I don’t think we realize how much value we are destroying by taking that approach. By maintaining a workforce that is that large, operating without a clear culture and having nothing in place to actually hold them accountable to a culture that drives the success of the organization, we are all but guaranteeing mediocrity. And I’m not saying all volunteer cultures are bad. That’s not the point. The point is you don’t know exactly what your volunteer culture is, and even if you do, you have set yourself up to be powerless to change it or shape it in a way that helps you accomplish your mission.

It doesn’t have to be this way. Earlier this year, at WorkXO, we released our Workplace Genome Platform to help organizations align their cultures with what they know is driving success. The platform revolves around an employee survey that helps you understand your culture with the precision and the nuance needed to make real and meaningful change inside your organization.

Now we are applying that same research and methodology to volunteers. We have converted the survey and the rest of the platform into a version that focuses specifically on volunteers. It gathers data from the volunteers themselves and will show you in great detail what your volunteer culture is truly like — across levels, geographic locations and volunteer tenure. Then we’ll help you determine whether that volunteer culture is aligned with what drives your success. Like the regular platform, it includes the survey and a year’s worth of resources and support to ensure the data you collect are converted into actions that generate meaningful change inside the organization.

This has the potential to unlock incredible value. Imagine volunteers who really knew what they were getting into when they signed up, where their routine behaviors were carefully aligned with what drives the results of the whole organization and where their experience as volunteers actually matched what they were promised as they were recruited. Suddenly, the traditional staff vs. volunteer battles would go away, because you’d all clearly be part of the same culture.

For example, here are four of the cultural building blocks on which we collect data in the survey:

  • If a process, procedure or approach is not working, we can correct it with ease.
  • People can make decisions and solve problems around here, even if they are not “in charge.”
  • We embrace change in this organization.
  • We eliminate activity that doesn’t move us toward our goal.

Again, these are just four of 64 different measures. When you start to see how different volunteer groups experience the culture and can pinpoint the contradictions and other patterns, it will open your eyes to the areas that need to shift in order for you to be more successful as an organization.

If you’d like more information on the program, please fill out our contact form and mention the Volunteer Edition, and we’ll get materials out to you.

21
Jul
16

How will new overtime rules affect your organization?

OT-Map-FINAL-medium-600x300In May, the United States Department of Labor released new overtime rules that will take effect on Dec. 1.

Since December will be here before we know it, nonprofits are already making adjustments, as the new rules will have significant implications for the nonprofit sector.

According to the National Council of Nonprofits, it all comes down to salary requirements.

With limited resources, many nonprofits can’t afford to pay their staff big bucks. Under the new regulations, most employees earning less than $47,500 will be entitled to overtime compensation. So think about your events and meetings. What will that mean?

That said, it’s a complex formula for understanding compliance, but the U.S. Department of Labor has published resources.

According to DOL, employers have a few options:

  • Pay time-and-a-half for overtime work.
  • Raise workers’ salaries above the new threshold.
  • Limit workers’ hours to 40 hours per week.
  • Combine options above.

The council offers some tips, as well.

“Employers have various options to comply with these change in overtime rules, ranging from increasing exempt employees’ salaries to the new level, converting them to hourly employees and paying overtime or making other changes to benefits or operations,” the National Council of Nonprofits said. “Nonprofits with budget years ending on June 30 will need to develop new budgets for the fiscal year beginning in six weeks that take these new changes into account. Nonprofits with budget years ending on Dec. 31 have more time to adjust and plan for 2017.”

In addition, the rules allow for the use of volunteers under certain circumstances, but DOL warns nonprofits shouldn’t use volunteers to skirt the regulations.

Working overtime

The department contends its new regulations will ensure companies – including nonprofits – adhere to the Fair Labor and Standards Act. It also says the new regulations will lead to a better work-life balance while increasing productivity and reducing turnover.

“Job titles never determine exempt status under the FLSA,” DOL said. “Additionally, receiving a particular salary, alone, does not indicate that an employee is exempt from overtime and minimum wage protections.”

Regardless of the exemptions the new rule provide, associations are concerned about the ramifications. According to ASAE, more than 250,000 associations submitted comments on the proposed rule to the department last year.

“Because the rule would dramatically expand the number of employees now eligible for overtime pay, associations and other employers could be forced to lay off staff or limit employees’ work outside of core business hours, stinting employees’ career growth and harming productivity,” wrote Chris Vest on June 1 in “Associations Now.”

Additionally, Alex Beall wrote about the new regulations, offering advice from Julia Judish, special counsel with Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP.

“Once the employer has identified which of its currently exempt employees would convert to nonexempt, the employer should start now requiring those employees to do the equivalent of clocking in and clocking out and track their average hours,” Judish said.

As December approaches, we’ll track the new DOL overtime rules and report changes and their implications for nonprofits.

Until then, if you’ve got tips to share, please email Kristen Parker at Kristen@eventgarde.com. We’d love to share them!

16
Feb
16

And the survey says…we’re scared

paris-attacks-new-york-670-1It was a Friday night and it had been a long week. I was just starting to unwind when my iPhone’s email notifications starting coming full blast.

And then the mindless show on TV was interrupted by horrific images of blown up Paris buildings; streets littered with debris; people scrambling for safety. And I sat there, trying to explain to my children why yet another act of terrorism destroyed lives, trying to assure them the world isn’t a dangerous place.

For days, the images of carnage shaped my thoughts. As I ran errands around town, I hoped that copycat incidents wouldn’t happen on my home turf. As for travel…I couldn’t even fathom the repercussions.

I’m guessing many of you experienced the same awful Friday night and since then have been rethinking international travel plans. Or what about your events? Are you prepared to handle acts of terrorism?

In the wake of the Paris attacks – and other acts of terrorism throughout the years – event professionals have grown increasingly concerned about safety, according to the latest Meetings Outlook by Meeting Professionals International.

The winter edition of the report found 44 percent of survey respondents think the meetings and events industry will change due to the increased threat of terrorism.

And this includes educational programming.

For example, MPI’s Carolinas Chapter plans to bolster its risk management education programs by bringing in law enforcement officials and leaders from the Red Cross to discuss how to best handle disaster.

The organization isn’t alone.

More than a quarter of respondents (28 percent) echo MPI Carolinas’ plans, making sweeping changes to how they run meetings. Measures include working with police on evacuation plans and offering employee training on rapid response.

sicurezzaIn addition, 15 percent of survey respondents plan to add security for the events – especially those organizations that host international conferences. Some are employing security agencies for counsel and preparation.

As for corporate travel plans? Increasing costs and security concerns mean fewer people will attend events. Instead of sending the whole staff, many companies will simply choose to send leadership, especially if an event is overseas.

The visa process will change, as will destinations of choice, MPI says.

The ripple effect: cost.

Nearly 40 percent of respondents believe room rates will rise. Food and beverage rates are predicted to increase 4.6 percent and air travel rates 4.2 percent. And so, organizations are spending much more cautiously.

“It’s not just having people at the registration desk but having a bit of heightened security on site,” said Bob Walker of the MPI Dallas/Fort Worth Chapter. “It’s having a larger security detail that is checking badges and making sure people who are in various areas of a hotel or convention hall have the credentials to be there.”

working-retirementIncreased protocol for security also means changing employee demographics, the report found. Why? The industry needs new professionals who have a better understanding of the current landscape, balanced by more seasoned professionals whose experience is invaluable to the newbies.

“For many meeting professionals, the challenge in coming months will be to balance concerns about lower spending power with the need to take advantage of current opportunities,” MPI says. “It’s not an easy one to tackle, but clearly, it’s an increasingly important one to master.”

The above is a lot to digest and the findings may seem a bit dismal. So to summarize:

  • 48 percent of respondents expect the cost of meetings to rise due to the need for increased security
  • 35 percent think room rates will rise by 6 percent or more throughout the next year
  • 31 percent say the number of full-time employees is increasing
  • 33 percent report online collaborative, interactive learning is important

What do you think? Have terrorism and/or safety concerns changed your event operations? Tell us about it.

14
Jul
15

Latest ruling could mean more unpaid internships

free_laborIt’s summer…and that means planning season for many of you. Perhaps that planning includes whether to hire an intern for the upcoming year. And with that comes the question: “Should we pay them?”

In September 2013, I wrote a post about the Black Swan case, in which a federal judge ruled that Fox Searchlight Pictures violated the Fair Labor Standards Act by not paying interns during the production of the 2010 movie “Black Swan.” (It was one of our most popular posts!)

The judge ruled the interns performed the same work duties for which others were paid and the internships didn’t provide an educational environment, but instead benefited the studio.

Now, just two years later, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has thrown a boon to employers – but a blow to interns.

On July 2, it ruled the Federal District Court in the Black Swan case used an incorrect standard – one set by the Department of Labor – to define an internship, declaring that as long as work serves an educational purpose, it can considered an internship – paid or unpaid. Using this test, a person is an employee only if the employer benefits more from the relationship than the intern.

Cutting through the legalese: This could make unpaid internships much easier to justify, and could lead to a surge of them in the workforce.

It’s a touchy conversation among millennials, most of whom expect to get paid for their services. As I wrote in the post two years ago, interns are no longer the “coffee getters” and “copy makers.” Most employers consider interns valuable team members and delegate professional responsibilities to them – many of the same responsibilities for which employees receive compensation.

But the argument remains: Does professional experience outweigh money?

The National Association of Colleges and Employers issued a statement on July 2 in response to the U.S. District Court’s ruling, saying, “At the foundation of such an assessment is the tenet that the internship is a legitimate learning experience benefiting the student and not simply an operational work experience that just happens to be conducted by a student. The core question, according to NACE, is whether or not work performed by an intern will primarily benefit the employer in a way that does not also advance the education of the student.”

Internships-resize200dpi2As further explanation, NACE developed criteria that employers can use to determine which experiences can legitimately be classified as internships:

  • The experience must be an extension of the classroom: a learning experience that provides for applying the knowledge gained in the classroom. It must not be simply to advance the operations of the employer or be the work that a regular employee would routinely perform.
  • The skills or knowledge learned must be transferable to other employment settings.
  • The experience has a defined beginning and end and a job description with desired qualifications.
  • There are clearly defined learning objectives/goals related to the professional goals of the student’s academic coursework.
  • There is supervision by a professional with expertise and educational and/or professional background in the field of the experience.
  • There is routine feedback by the experienced supervisor.
  • There are resources, equipment and facilities provided by the host employer that support learning objectives/goals.
  • Unpaid internships in the not-for-profit sector reflect the fiscal realities and limitations for organizations in that sector and are acknowledged accordingly in current Department of Labor guidelines and enforcement practices.
  • All interns, regardless of their compensation, should enjoy similar basic protections in the work setting consistent with all laws, ethical considerations and sound business practices.

At the same time, NACE’s 2015 Internship & Co-op Survey found the current overall average hourly rate for bachelor’s degree-level interns, adjusted for inflation to 2010 levels, is $15.98. In comparison, the average hourly rate for interns was $17 in 2010.

While associations and nonprofits may not be first of mind for interns, they offer valuable experiential learning experiences, wrote Todd Van Deak, president and founder of Philadelphia-based TVD Associates, in an October 2013 Event Garde post.

So it’s important to consider how your organization could enhance interns’ educational experiences.

As a follow up, tell us…do you pay your interns? Why or why not?

31
Mar
15

Nonprofits and associations are hiring…even in a candidate’s market

Now hiringWe’re nearing college commencement season. In about six to eight weeks, excited college graduates around the country will don their caps and gowns, ready to hit the workforce with enthusiasm and a bit of trepidation.

And so, once again, we’re reading a lot about hiring – and in some cases, lack thereof.

But there’s good news for graduates and jobseekers in general: Associations and nonprofits are hiring.

According to a recent report by Professionals for Nonprofits, nearly 60 percent of nonprofits increased their staff size in 2014 and 55 percent plan to add staff this year. And, with demand exceeding supply, salaries are on the rise.

In fact, 70 percent of the organizations reported two to 10 vacancies in their organizations. As for hiring priorities, fundraising and membership tied at No. 1, with marketing and communications taking the No. 2 slot, followed by technology.

“In a major shift from 2014-2015, our survey results show that it has become a candidate’s market, increasing the challenge for nonprofit managers to find and hire the staff they need and to pay the higher salaries required,” the report says.

And demographics are shifting. Gen X – those born from 1965 to 1981 – still make up most of the workforce. After a few years under their belt, these employees are ready for leadership positions. That opens the door for Gen Y staffers – those 32 years old or younger – who now comprise half the workforce, as reported in the study.

Gen hiresWith the shift comes changing expectations and skill sets. Gen Y is ripe with entrepreneurial spirit, independence and technologically-savvy minds. They know they’ve got the leg up, which means hiring has become more difficult for nonprofits, the report found. Job seekers can afford to be a bit more selective. Not surprisingly, the top reason for turning down a job offer was compensation. The second reason? A perceived lack of growth opportunities.

So what does this mean for associations and nonprofits?

PNP offers some tips on hiring:

  • Pay competitive salaries
  • Foster a positive workplace culture and environment
  • Cultivate opportunities for growth, training and professional development
  • Avoid a lengthy hiring process so “the good ones” don’t get away
  • Be clear about job responsibilities and rewards
  • Look for potential leadership capabilities in staff and new hires

All this said, here’s my two cents. My first job out of college was working for an association, from which I moved to another association. Neither was afraid to take a chance on a recent college graduate, and showed it by offering me competitive compensation and fun, inspiring work environments.

Both jobs (in the editorial and communications division) were incredible experiences, so I encourage you to tap into the newly graduated young professionals in your area.

23
Sep
14

The benefits of educating about benefits

surveyAs a follow up to my Aug. 19 post about associations offering voluntary benefits to their members, I thought it would be wise think about benefits for association employees.

I’ll mention it again: With extensive media coverage of the Affordable Care Act, benefits are on everyone’s mind. In fact, just the other day while I was grocery shopping, two women were discussing their benefits while they compared the price of cheese.

It’s true that larger organizations can generally provide better – and more comprehensive – health care benefits. But according to a rather surprising Unum survey conducted recently, most employees don’t know or understand the benefits they have.

And employers are at fault, the study found. Surveying 1,521 working adults, it revealed that employee satisfaction with their workplaces and benefits is at its lowest since 2008.

Conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Unum, an insurance provider, only 49 percent of workers indicated their places of employment are good places to work, while only 47 percent ranked their benefits as good.

But here’s the kicker: The research also showed that employees don’t feel they’re getting adequate information about their benefits. In the survey, only 33 percent of employees rated the benefits education they received as excellent or very good – a drop from 2012 and a reversal to the upward trend in ratings since 2009.

So why does this matter? Associations generally operate with small staffs, so it’s important that your employees are happy, and the survey found a correlation between good benefits education and employee happiness. In other words, an informed employee is a productive employee.

In addition, according to the survey, 79 percent of workers who reviewed benefits in the past year and rated their education as excellent or very good also rate their employer as excellent or very good – compared to only 30 percent of those who said the education they received was fair or poor.

“This research underscores the value of an effective benefits education plan because when an employee understands their benefits, they tend to value them more and in turn may then value their employers more for providing access to them,” said Bill Dalicandro, vice president of the consumer solutions group at Unum.

educationBottom line: Employers need to do a better job educating their staffs about benefits. But how?

It doesn’t matter how large or small your organization is, chances are, a dedicated staff person handles human resources. That person should be responsible for providing such an education.

How? Rapid Learning Institute shared some tips in a recent blog post. It suggests offering materials for various learning types: printed materials and videos for visual learners; podcasts and audio conferences for auditory learners; and interactive online tools or worksheets for tactile learners.

The most common way to educate continues to be printed materials, the institute said, but emails, social media and internal messaging systems also work well.

Or consider hosting educational benefit sessions throughout the year. Have a little-known perk? A tax tip? Communicate with your employees on a regular basis.




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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