Archive for the 'Social Media' Category

28
Jul
16

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news – August edition

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Stephanie Wohlfert. Courtesy of Michigan Meetings + Events.

Q & A with Stephanie Wohlfert, meetings coordinator, MSAE

Q: Learn: What’s one subject you’d like to learn more about?
A: Nutrition Science – Throughout the last several years I’ve become more conscious about health and wellness and what my family and I eat daily. I focus on eating non-processed foods without all the fillers and preservatives. I have a very good understanding of why this is important; however, I’d love to take it to another level and understand the science behind it, too, so I can educate others as well.

Q: Network: Social media or face-to-face? Which form of networking is better and why?
A: Although I’m a fan of social media for so many other reasons, when it comes to networking, I think I’ll forever be “old school” in thinking face-to-face is the best form of networking. I know we are a lot busier in our personal and professional lives than ever before, but I’ll never get tired of physically attending a networking event to meet people in person. I feel that you can connect with people so much more on a personal level this way.

Q: Transfer: Please share with us a resource you just can’t live without.
A: I don’t read as many books as I’d like but my go-to book to keep me on track is “Secrets of the Obvious” by Harry Cohen. One of my colleagues gave me this book several years ago when I was very green in the industry and feeling overwhelmed with balancing my personal and professional life. Sometimes we get so caught up with the hustle and bustle of everyday activities that we forget the basics and how just focusing on a few positive changes will restore that balance!

Q: Tell us about an experience in which you learned something new and then applied it to your personal or professional life.
A: Ah, yes! Last year I attended the Convention Industry Council’s CMP “Conclave” and I’ll never forget the opening keynote speaker, Andy Cohen. His presentation was titled, “The Assumpt,” and it was all about the daily assumptions we make and how sometimes we treat our assumptions as truths rather than reality. Every time I hear or think the word “assume,” I now instantly think of why I should be more aware, keep an open mind and ask more questions.

Q: Which adjectives best describe you?
A: Dependable. I think I’ve been carrying around this adjective to best describe me for quite some time but I pride myself in always being reliable to those around me. Although I feel like I can always do more for people, I love helping out and doing things for others. I want my friends, family, colleagues and those I meet along the way to know they can always depend on me.

31
May
16

Community management is about strategy

pr-online-communities-20368498Although still relatively new, online communities are quickly becoming popular platforms for engagement, discussion and membership.

But there’s still some confusion about best practices and culture, according to a new report by The Community Roundtable and Higher Logic.

“In the current environment, it’s easy to question or second guess ourselves, but one thing I feel strongly about is this: A community approach can help navigate these issues in a way that brings along customers, prospects and employees,” said Rachel Happe, principal and co-founder, The Community Roundtable. “It is the best way, and maybe the only way, to keep our organizations in sync with themselves and with their markets.”

Happe said communities are the most effective way to deliver learning and change – much better than social media platforms, which are inundated with advertisements.

The Higher Logic report contains data from 339 community programs from a range of industries. The first takeaway: strategy. Strategy is based upon a shared understanding of value. In other words, communities must define value to their organization and to their community to foster engagement. In addition, the report found those who could measure that value to determine ROI performed best.

Next: operations. Giving members a voice is key to community success. Communities that provide a formal feedback system, multi-tiered advocacy program and member-led community programs far outperformed their peers.

And then, tactics: Most communities measure basic activity and membership, but going beyond that, including regularly tracking activity, behavior change and outcomes, reaps big rewards.

Happe

Rachel Happe, principal and co-founder, The Community Roundtable

Some recommendations from Higher Logic:

STRATEGY: Create strong, defined value statements for your organization and members, highlighting the shared value of the community. Tip: Boil it down: What’s the value that the organization and members get from being a part of the community – and where do those value statements intersect?

OPERATIONS: Engage and empower members, through feedback programs, member- and internal expert-led programs and by prioritizing getting organizational buy-in and understanding of community. Giving the community a say in its operation can help increase engagement and community contributions. Tip: Tap into the expertise in your membership – communities that include member-led programming demonstrate higher engagement and maturity than their peers.

TACTICS: Focus metrics and measurement on the behaviors you want to see, not just the ones you can easily measure. Everyone measures something, but the best-in-class communities are digging into the metrics that demonstrate the impact of the community. Tip: Use frameworks to better connect behavior changes to metrics so that you can more readily explain the value of the community to members and the organization.

“As community professionals, we need to keep our focus on the fundamentals and continue to reinforce value and success,” Happe said. “Don’t lose sight of the basics; continue the dialog with those that can benefit from your community; and develop an ROI model to define the specific business value that is generated from the community.”

10
May
16

Building community with a click

communityOne of the best benefits of attending professional events is networking – whether face to face or via social media.

And it often starts before an event. Personally, before I attend a conference, I search Twitter for the event’s hashtag to engage in conversation and “meet” colleagues.

That said, searching Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn can be time consuming and overwhelming.

But event apps can help, according to a new e-book by DoubleDutch.

“It’s time to make use of innovative technology to enhance face-to-face connections, redefine engagement, keep the conversation alive, inform better content, build more robust social media communities and ultimately demonstrate the ROI of event marketing,” DoubleDutch says. “An event app provides community managers countless opportunities to build an audience before the event, engage during and keep engagement thriving long after the event has come to an end.”

Nearly all event marketers – 88 percent – use social media to create event hype. This means more than just promoting products and services; it means fostering conversation and building a community.

Event apps allow attendees to check in to events and post status updates. In other words, an event app mirrors an event-specific social networking platform. At the same time, apps allow event planners to gather and analyze data. In addition, by engaging in conversation, speakers can tailor presentations to address specific questions and concerns – thereby boosting ROI for event participants.

ts_140501_smartphone_apps_800x600

DoubleDutch has a few suggestions:

  • A welcome video from a CEO/chairperson
  • Interactive case studies in the form of Q & As
  • Access to presentations and other content
  • Live polls and audience surveys
  • Exclusive deals and promotions
  • Exhibitor giveaways

During a program, an event planner should:

  • Assign an app champion – Appoint a staff person to visit sessions and walk the exhibition floor to identify hot spots and key takeaways to share with attendees.
  • Stay in control – Sometimes things happen (room changes, session cancellations) and an app allows event planners to communicate quickly with attendees. At the same time, by following in-app conversations, event planners can nip a potential issue in the bud.
  • Share in real time – Build a crowd-sourced multi-media library in which participants can post resources and photos – both during and after the event.
  • Elevate key influencers – Find active app users and promote their posts. Call them out and show your appreciation. Encourage app users to sync apps with their social media profiles to maximize engagement.

In short, event apps allow attendees to learn from others; network before, during and after an event; and transfer their knowledge to their teams long after an event ends.

“Event marketing is crucial for forming connections with customers and sponsors, growing your digital community and building brand sentiment,” DoubleDutch says. “It is an opportunity to amplify engaged communities around your brand, product or service. Social media grows and engages those connections, but even the most adept community manager can’t attain the best event results through social media alone.”

26
Apr
16

Some must-dos for ASAE’s annual meeting

 

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Lowell Aplebaum

In anticipation of the ASAE Annual Meeting and Exposition, which will be held Aug. 13-16 in Salt Lake City, Utah, we’ll be providing some tips on how to maximize your experience.

 

 

To start us off, Lowell Aplebaum shares his advice. Follow him on Twitter at @LowellMatthew.

 

Do you have some tips to share? Email Kristen Parker at Kristen@eventgarde.com.

 

 

  1. For each session time slot, map out a first and second session choice. It is very acceptable at ASAE to switch sessions if the content or format doesn’t accommodate your learning style. Having a second choice in your back pocket can make this easier.
  2. A few weeks before, start following the conference hashtag on Twitter (#asae16). You will see a stream of information about sessions, receptions, etc.  Better yet, you will start to virtually “meet” some of people who will be there. I actually found the colleague who eventually became my CAE study buddy by first connecting on a Twitter chat!
  1. Registration opens at 7 a.m. on Saturday so make sure you get there early rather than waiting until Sunday.
  2. Check out the Hive/New Bee Lounge. Though they shift the name sometimes, this lounge will have a new “bee” sticker (yes, it is a bee) that is unobtrusive on your badge, but a good wink to other newbies too.
  3. Make sure you arrive in time for Opening Reception, which will be held at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Everyone flows differently – some like to show up and just play pinball, bouncing from new person to new person. Others feel more confident when networking with a buddy or even a small group. Think about how you best meet people and try to set yourself up for networking success before you even step in the room.
  4. giveGetOpening Keynote (or any of them) – Move up! The back may fill up more quickly, but that isn’t because that’s where the best seats are located. Want to see and hear better? Sit near the front.
  5. Session selection – Think of the individual sessions you attend as a “choose your own adventure.” Did you just meet someone and are having a really interesting conversation? Pivot, go to a session together and see how you can help each other learn. If you’re following the conference Twitter stream and hear some interesting buzz about a session, attend. Ultimately, you might want a mix of sessions. And don’t count on outlets. Most session rooms won’t have many outlets, if any at all. Those that do will quickly be in use by those who show up to session early. Think about your charging needs and carry a backup battery for your phone just in case.
  6. Attend a Community Section Reception on Sunday. The YP one is a great place to start, though any of these are open and offer smaller networking opportunities to meet new colleagues.
  7. The Expo Hall is a place to secure new vendor relationships and also to see what’s on the horizon for association tools, resources, partners and locations. If you aren’t coming with direct business to do, still walk the hall, using it as a learning experience. Expo Hall hours throughout two days are long. If you find you have exhausted the floor, that’s the perfect time to check out some of the lounges that are available. At a minimum, the ASAE Foundation lounge the past few years has sponsored Chuck Fazio’s Headshot Lounge where you can get free professional headshots. Also, the lounge hosting the ASAE Career HQ is good to check out (or even see if they have a really low-price career coaching session available).
  8. Non-ASAE Sponsored Receptions – By the time you get to Sunday night, you will have met a few people so ask where they are going and join in! Remember – It isn’t about how many receptions you attend, but about what you do with the time you spend at each. If the people attending resonate with where you are/what you’re looking for, stay and talk.
  9. Awards & Recognition Breakfast – This optional event on Monday morning is early. With that said, do you want inspiration and vision for the future of our industry? Come see our next leaders.
  10. ASAE Foundation – The ASAE Foundation is our industry’s entity, supporting our field with research, innovation grants and investments in the future of associations. There is a foundation donor reception on Saturday evening before the opening reception for those who make a certain level donation. Besides investing in your profession, this reception is smaller than the opening and filled with others that have taken that next step to invest in the association field as well. It’s a worthwhile way to get your feet wet at your first conference.
12
Apr
16

Use the media to manage your relationships

media_monitoringIn the early stages of my career when I was working as communications director for a nonprofit, I was amazed at how quickly a national issue could become local.

National grassroots efforts steadily trickled down to local and state governments and organizations so I found myself buried in issues management. Every day, I scanned news outlets across the nation and throughout the state to see which issues may affect my daily operations, but more importantly, the operations of our members. Think federal and state funding!

After a few years in public relations, I’ve learned that to build support, staying on top of trends and issues is key, as is listening to your audiences – otherwise known as key publics.

A new whitepaper by Media Miser – a media analytics and tracking company – spells out the importance of relationship management.

“Effective communications means more than just managing issues through the media,” Media Miser said. “Companies and organizations must also be aware of their external publics – the people and groups outside of an organization’s sphere that affect, or are affected by, what that organization does. This is known as relationship management: the discipline of identifying key publics and establishing strategies for building and maintaining mutually beneficial relationships with them.”

Step 1: quote analysis. Chances are, your communications staff is monitoring media, but pay attention to quotes. Doing so will allow you to see what your stakeholders are thinking and saying about the trends and issues that could affect your organization. If you’re not on track, their words will tell you.

Also look for advocates and “badvocates.” By scanning for quotes and statements, you can assess who’s on your side – and who’s not. If the media heavily quote someone, he or she could be an opinion leader – and a media favorite – so it’s wise to determine whether your organization’s positions align with that person’s agenda.

As I mentioned before, keeping an eye on regional news will give your organization a taste of the key publics within that region, and could help your association strengthen its presence and capitalize on hot-button issues and trends. For example – knowledge. Is there something happening about which you can best educate that region?

And messaging. It’s so important. Whoever handles communications in your organization needs to develop consistent messaging. That said, staff can tailor those messages to a region or stakeholder’s concerns.

“If you want people to trust you and your organization, consistency is a must,” Media Miser said. “Trust is the first step in developing a relationship with opinion leaders and your key publics. The last thing you want is to communicate different messages regarding the same issue: Without consistency, you run the risk of looking insincere. This will inhibit your publics’ ability to trust you, and without trust it’s impossible to maintain a mutually beneficial relationship.”

It goes without saying that people appreciate transparency, so always, I mean ALWAYS, be honest. Your organization doesn’t want to be caught in the middle of a public relations quagmire.

business-relationshipIn summary, pay attention to what media – and this includes bloggers and niche reporters – are writing about. Even if an issue doesn’t seem important to your industry, it could tangentially relate. Remember: Media are key to helping you build relationships.

Other questions to consider:

  • Is there mutual trust between your organization and your key publics?
  • Is there an equal exchange and benefit? Are you seeing a reaction to your relationship management efforts, or are they falling flat? Should you focus your efforts on different key publics who are more likely to reciprocate?
  • Is your company committed to maintaining a relationship with your key publics? Are you continuing to nurture every relationship that you’ve developed?
  • Are you satisfied with the relationship? Are your key publics satisfied? What can you do to improve these levels of satisfaction?
30
Mar
16

Bonus Content Event Garde e-news – April edition

Emily_wedding

Emily Thomas

Q & A with Emily Thomas, assistant director and membership manager, Association of Outdoor Recreation and Education

Q: Would you rather sky dive, bungee jump or climb to the top of the Golden Gate Bridge, and why?
A: Bungee jump. It’s a bucket list item of mine that gives me butterflies just thinking about it!

Q: If you could live someone else’s life for a day, who would it be, and why? 
A: Being a fan of taking risks and not afraid of pressure, I’d choose the president. For starters, it would be a humbling experience understanding what the president and his team are tasked with on a daily basis and the obstacles in their course. And due to my curious nature, I’d also be very interested in learning “behind the scenes” tidbits about being president.

Q: Learn: What’s one subject you’d like to learn more about?
A: Coding. HTML, JavaScript, C++, all of them.  

Q: Network: Social media or face-to-face? Which form of networking is better and why?
A: I prefer face-to-face but in today’s world with associations serving communities far from their home office, social media is the way to go.

Q: Transfer: Tell us about an experience in which you learned something new and then applied it to your personal or professional life.
A: I immediately think of the various Stephen Covey courses I’ve taken (think: “Seven Habits of Highly Effective People.”) One course in particular, “Speed of Trust,” taught me 13 specific behaviors that, when implemented, will promote trust and in turn lead to lasting change within an organization. After the course, I brought the materials back to my office and led my department in focusing on one new behavior each week to build a more cohesive and trusting team. I still look back on the trust cards today for dealing with tricky situations.

09
Feb
16

Coming soon to association learning: gamified learning and microcredentials

Jeff Cobb and Celisa Steele

Jeff Cobb and Celisa Steele, co-founders of Tagoras

Tagoras recently released its much-anticipated 2016 Association Learning + Technology Report, which contains a wealth of information about associations’ efforts to incorporate technology into their educational programs and platforms.

We know the educational landscape is changing as associations adapt to their members’ learning needs and habits. In fact, almost 90 percent of the nearly 200 associations that responded to Tagoras’ survey reported offering technology-enabled or technology-enhanced education for their members.

How?

Webinars continue to be the No. 1 technological learning tool, followed by online learning programs, such as tutorials or presentations.

But some new types of learning are also emerging: massive open online courses, flipped classes, gamified learning, microcredentials and microlearning, which has the highest rate of adoption.

Other key takeaways from the report:

  • Social media – Not surprisingly, associations use YouTube for education. But Twitter ranks a close second followed by LinkedIn and Facebook.
  • Mobile learning – About 41 percent of associations that use technology for learning provide a mobile version of their content. In addition, in the next year, 26 percent plan to go mobile.
  • Live streaming – Not many associations offer virtual conferences, but instead nearly 30 percent said they live stream events.
  • Learning Management Systems – A LMS is the second most popular technology platform. In fact, the percentage of LMS users increased from 51 percent in 2013 to 60 percent in 2015.
  • Data – Despite a growing use in technology, less than one-fifth of respondents said they always use data to decide which learning platforms to use for future educational opportunities.
  • Instructional design – More than 50 percent of associations employ instructional designers.
  • Chief Learning Officer – About 40 percent of respondents said someone within their organization holds a title that incorporates the word “learning.”
  • Knowledge transfer – More than 30 percent of associations reported using technology to sustain learning after the completion of an educational product or service.
  • Credentialing – Across the board, credentialing is becoming increasingly important for education. In fact, 68 percent of associations provide education to support a credential required in their field.

internet-315799_1280Blending technology and learning seems to make business sense for associations. More than half of those surveyed have seen an increase in revenue from their educational offerings. In addition, the associations that employ a Chief Learning Officer, or someone with a similar title, net more revenue from their educational offerings than those that don’t. Read: Credibility counts.

All this said, cost is still a top concern among associations. Just more than 50 percent of respondents said they’re satisfied with the cost of creating educational offerings and the cost of employing staff to develop and execute them.

Somewhat disappointing: Only 18 percent of associations that use technology think they’re successful.

“Technology has changed learning irrevocably, and the rate of change isn’t likely to slow,” Tagoras said. “This creates a clear opportunity for technology to transition into a more significant, more strategic part of the mix of education and professional development associations provide to members.”

As this happens, Tagoras predicts:

  • Growth in implementation of learning platforms and their integration with other key systems, like association management systems
  • A continued focus on professional instructional design to help ensure educational products are effective
  • An increase in competition that will, in turn, drive experimentation as associations look at how best to deliver more value
  • The professionalization of the education function overall and the growth of roles like chief learning officer

Aligning with Event Garde’s tagline, Learn.Network.Transfer, look for blog posts throughout the next few months that break down specific elements of Tagoras’ report.




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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