Archive for the 'Leadership' Category

19
Apr
16

Would Mother Earth approve of ‘green’ venues?

Earth-DayOn Friday, we’ll celebrate Mother Nature’s finest creations. Spring is finally here in Michigan and as robins chirp and flowers start to bloom, it’s the perfect time for Earth Day.

Friday is Earth Day, so in anticipation of all things sustainability, let’s take a look at the Green Venue Report 2015, produced by Greenview and Twirl Management.

In the second annual survey, 30 convention centers, representing more than 57 million square feet of space, responded.

According to the report, there are seven best practices among environmentally friendly venues:

  • 83 percent have achieved a sustainability-related certification.
  • 80 percent donate excess food to local charities on an ongoing basis.
  • 85 percent participate in sustainability programs or initiatives led by their city.
  • 77 percent have an employee green team or sustainability committee.
  • 70 percent have a dedicated sustainability coordinator or sustainability manager on staff.
  • 87 percent have secure bike parking for staff.
  • 72 percent can provide event planners a specific waste diversion report for their event.

As for physical attributes, some venues have a green roof, which means it’s partially or all covered with vegetation. Green roofs reduce building energy use, air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, beekeeping seems to be an increasing trend, with some venues practicing it on their green roofs.

Another emerging trend: onsite gardening. About one-third of venues produce food onsite from their gardens.

In addition to bolstering accessibility options for guests, an increasing number of venues offer transportation options for their employees. Fewer cars on the road means fewer emissions, so 63 percent of venues offer alternative transportation, or incentives for using public transportation, while 64 percent of venues offer electric car parking and charging.

The report states that while having someone lead efforts is key to fostering venue-wide sustainability, it’s challenging to keep employees engaged. Managers report they spend significant time training staff on environmental stewardship to help them understand the “why,” not just the “how.”

In fact, some organizations hold incentive programs for employees who are the most dedicated to reducing environmental footprints, hosting things such as luncheons.

global_sustainability-green-integrationAnd, of course, efforts would be remiss without effective communications. At the foundation of communications should be a clear sustainability policy that’s shared with all audiences. In the survey, 97 percent of venues reported having an internal sustainability policy and 64 percent said their policy is publicly available. At the same time, 45 percent of venues produce an annual sustainability report.

All efforts aside, Greenview found there’s confusion about terminology and measurement of practices. Data aren’t consistent and standards are lacking.

From the report:

“If these numbers are telling us that convention centers and planners are actually discussing sustainability, yet planners are still not taking advantage of sustainability programs, then perhaps this misstep in communication highlights a significant problem in the way we talk about sustainability in general. Perhaps there is an opportunity for centers to change the way they communicate their programs. Event sustainability conversations can’t be focused on additional costs and impact reports. Conversations need to happen in a way where planners better understand how utilizing the sustainable programs in place will enable them to create a unique and powerful event experience. An event that can be a showcase of organizational brand values, that has the potential to enhance attendee experience, demonstrate leadership, potentially reduce costs and is more efficient and less wasteful.”

So take some time on Friday and think about how your organization practices sustainability. And the next time you’re booking a venue, ask about its sustainability practices.

We’re all in this together. We only have one Earth, so let’s take care of it!

08
Mar
16

The makings of a good nonprofit

nonprofit word in letterpress type

As some of you may know, I launched my career in nonprofit. I quickly learned that nonprofits play a crucial role in just about every industry.

While each nonprofit thrives on its own accord and each offers something unique to the constituents it serves, there are common traits that define a good nonprofit.

Perhaps more than anything else, good leadership molds a successful nonprofit. Excellence starts at the top, trickling down to those who support leadership.

But what else?

TVD Associates recently unveiled an infographic, “10 Traits that Make a Nonprofit Great.”

I won’t go through the entire list but a few traits are worth pointing out.

  • Focus on a few things – Think quality not quantity. It’s tempting to provide everything to everyone, but it’s much more effective to specialize in a few products and services. Nonprofits that stick to a mission and develop measurable goals perform the best.
  • Develop diverse funding sources – I’ve written before about methods to increase non-dues revenue since members shouldn’t provide the only funding stream. In addition, funding should also come from grants, special events and local foundations.
  • Reach the right audiences – I’ve said before and I’ll say it again: Communication is key, especially tailored communications. It’s best to identify three key audiences and craft messages specific to those communications needs. Key audiences include staff, board members and volunteers (internal messaging works well for this audience), those who might use products and services (think potential clients here, too) and potential donors.
  • Say thank you and ask for help – Nonprofits often ask for dollars, but a good nonprofit lists specific needs and builds financial transparency by providing examples of responsible stewardship. And when receiving funds, nonprofits that thank donors – based on their amount of giving – will earn respect.
  • Commitment to excellence – Good nonprofits keep apprised of industry trends and engage in professional development. They follow and seek out best practices; evaluate their programs and services; measure and publish outcomes; and communicate their efforts toward excellence.

excellence-340x213

“There are many other traits that are easy for organizations to overlook or to let fall by the wayside in favor of achieving day-to-day objectives,” TVD Associates said. “Also, for most nonprofits, the prospect of reflecting on, evaluating and altering the organization’s guiding tenets is daunting at best.”

What are your thoughts? What defines a good nonprofit?

27
Feb
16

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news – March edition

Debra

Debra Zabloudil, president and CEO, The Learning Studio Inc.

Q & A with Debra Zabloudil, president and CEO, The Learning Studio Inc.

Q: If I were writing a book about your life, what would the title be, and why?
A: It would be titled, “An Unexpected Life” because life has thrown a number of things my way that most would not have expected (good and bad). As an emerging adult, my life looked set, to be fairly prescribed and somewhat privileged, and it has turned out to be a different landscape. But somehow you live and work through it all and come out better on the other end.

Q: Give us one little-known fact about you.
A: My family has been blessed by adoption, and I am a very big proponent of adoption as a beautiful way to build a family.

Q: Learn: How do you learn best – in a coffee shop with lots of noise or in a quiet, library-like setting? 
A: For me, it’s much less about the setting. I learn best by inspiration. When something makes me “feel something” it stays with me. (I love the quote from Maya Angelou that people don’t remember what you say; they remember how you made them feel.) I also learn by connecting the dots in my own mind, by seeing something or hearing something that inspires me or makes me think and by connecting it to my life, my work, my client’s needs, etc.

Q: Network: Some people are wallflowers while others are natural networkers. Which are you? 
A: I am a natural networker. I’m pretty sure I “popped out” that way. I truly love meeting new people, and have a genuine interest in knowing what makes other people tick.

Q: Transfer: Let’s say you just attended a certification course. What would be your first step in applying what you learned? 
A: It may sound a bit old school, but when I am learning, I take notes – physically in a notebook. Then, when I have a quiet moment, I go back to the notebook, transfer the thoughts I want to expand on to a different page and start extrapolating and drawing connections (picture charts, arrows, etc.). For me, it helps to expand on the learning and take it to the next level.

29
Dec
15

Connecting for Maximum Event Success

View More: http://pinupbyginger.pass.us/anne-bonneys-final-edits

Anne Bonney

This month’s guest blog post is by Anne Bonney. She is a John Maxwell Team certified speaker, trainer and coach specializing in leadership and empowerment topics. Bonney has spent the last 20 years bringing this to leadership and educational roles with companies including Under Armour, Les Mills International, Town Sports International and The New England Aquarium. 

Thanks to Bonney for submitting her post! If you have a guest post to share, please send it to kristen@eventgarde.com.

Managing and executing events is a tough job – one you can’t do alone. Event planners have to rely on the help of vendors, staff and sometimes volunteers to make an event successful. If everyone is on the same page, and they respect your leadership, an event runs like clockwork and it’s a beautiful thing! Everyone wants that…so how can you be that kind of leader?

  • PROVIDE ALL THE INFORMATION: Create a template for your vendors, staff and volunteers that has all relevant information. Have others on your staff take a look at it to be sure it’s thorough. Try to create a standard template that you can use for each event.
  • PROVIDE ROLE CLARITY: Assigning roles and making sure everyone knows their area of responsibility prior to the event will allow you to supervise the whole event while your staffers manage each moving part.
    • Volunteers: Nothing is worse than showing up to volunteer and having nothing to do! Be sure that whomever is coordinating the volunteers has clear instructions and can give your volunteers all information before and during the event so they’re confident they had a positive effect on the success of the event.
    • Staff: Everyone should have a clear job. They should know what they’re doing, why and what it’s going to look like when they’re successful.
      • Assign captains so there’s one go-to person for each functional area of the event (registration, sponsors, AV and stage, food, talent, etc.). Once you’ve done that, and you’ve given the information and tools they need to be successful, empower them by letting them do their job!
    • ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES: Get in there when things get hairy. If things aren’t going as planned, be sure help get things back on track. When your staff and volunteers see you rolling up your sleeves and busting your butt too, they’re likely to work even harder for you.
    • LEARN PEOPLE’S NAMES: People love to hear their names, and when the busy person in charge of a large event remembers their names, it has a huge impact. There are tons of techniques to help you remember names. It will make a HUGE difference in people’s commitment to your event.
    • THANK EVERYONE: Without them, you’d be sunk, so tell people how much you appreciate their part in making the event successful. If you have the budget for a small gesture, even better, but a simple, well-timed “thank you, you’re making a difference” will go a long way in their commitment to you now, and how much they’re willing to help you in the future.

If you can do these things, your team will function like a well-oiled machine. And this will leave you free to deal with unforeseen challenges and create a team that’s energized and excited to be a part of your events.

Event Garde is a professional development consulting firm that employs a versatile skill set and a wealth of experience to create well-connected leaders. We’re committed to lifelong learning, for ourselves and for our clients, believing in its ability to produce transformational experiences that advance innovation. Sharing our deep knowledge, we’re dedicated to performance improvement for the professionals we serve and those who attend the events we facilitate.

 

31
Aug
15

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news – September edition

Cora Geujen

Cora Geujen, director of event planning, Renaissance Esmeralda Resort and Spa

Q & A with Cora Geujen, director of event planning, Renaissance Esmeralda Resort and Spa

Q: If you could live someone else’s life for a day, who would it be, and why?
A: Princess Catharine’s, of course. For the hair and wardrobe.

Q: What’s your spirit animal, and why?
A: The first animal that popped into my mind was a tigress; I’m fierce when needed, protective of my team and always in the background to keep informed of what’s going on with my team. But of course I had to take an Internet quiz and it turns out I identify with the butterfly, with a secondary connection to the tiger. Go figure.

Q: Chocolate, strawberry or vanilla ice cream, and why?
A: Chocolate with a side of mint chips. Because I’m fresh.

Q: Which adjectives best describe you?
A: Snarky…

Q: If you could eat only one food for a week, what would it be, and why?
A: My mother’s Thanksgiving stuffing. It tastes like family and transports me back to my childhood.

03
May
15

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news May edition

Bonnifer BallardQ & A with Bonnifer Ballard, executive director, Michigan Section, American Water Works Association

Q: If you could have any question answered, what would it be?
A: I like that we don’t have all the answers. I like the process of discovery. But if I could choose to read just one answer from the “back of the book,” the one thing I would ask is, “Is time travel possible?”

Q: If you could have one wish, what would it be?
A: Wow, this is tough. So much to wish for! I guess if I only had one, it would be that everyone on the planet has a safe place to live and not be hungry. What a different world it would be!

 Q: If you could invite four famous people to dinner, who would you choose and why?
Albert Einstein, Maya Angelou, Eleanor Roosevelt and Neil deGrasse Tyson. What amazing conversation we could have!

Q: If you could learn any skill, what would it be?
A: There is still so much I need to learn. And I like learning new things. So those that are really important to me are already on the list. However, the one skill that seems to elude me consistently is the use of tools. Power tools, manual tools, it doesn’t matter; I just don’t seem to have the knack for hitting a nail on the head, drilling a screw into wood or turning a bolt. It’s a struggle every time I pick up a tool. My brain understands but my hands don’t follow. It’s very frustrating.

Q: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you live?
A: I like living in Michigan. We just moved back last year after living in Chicago for 15 years and I’m loving it. I guess if I could move my family with me, and money were no object, I would choose a beach with warm water, cool nights, no mosquitoes and no hurricanes or tsunamis. Is there such a place?

31
Mar
15

Nonprofits and associations are hiring…even in a candidate’s market

Now hiringWe’re nearing college commencement season. In about six to eight weeks, excited college graduates around the country will don their caps and gowns, ready to hit the workforce with enthusiasm and a bit of trepidation.

And so, once again, we’re reading a lot about hiring – and in some cases, lack thereof.

But there’s good news for graduates and jobseekers in general: Associations and nonprofits are hiring.

According to a recent report by Professionals for Nonprofits, nearly 60 percent of nonprofits increased their staff size in 2014 and 55 percent plan to add staff this year. And, with demand exceeding supply, salaries are on the rise.

In fact, 70 percent of the organizations reported two to 10 vacancies in their organizations. As for hiring priorities, fundraising and membership tied at No. 1, with marketing and communications taking the No. 2 slot, followed by technology.

“In a major shift from 2014-2015, our survey results show that it has become a candidate’s market, increasing the challenge for nonprofit managers to find and hire the staff they need and to pay the higher salaries required,” the report says.

And demographics are shifting. Gen X – those born from 1965 to 1981 – still make up most of the workforce. After a few years under their belt, these employees are ready for leadership positions. That opens the door for Gen Y staffers – those 32 years old or younger – who now comprise half the workforce, as reported in the study.

Gen hiresWith the shift comes changing expectations and skill sets. Gen Y is ripe with entrepreneurial spirit, independence and technologically-savvy minds. They know they’ve got the leg up, which means hiring has become more difficult for nonprofits, the report found. Job seekers can afford to be a bit more selective. Not surprisingly, the top reason for turning down a job offer was compensation. The second reason? A perceived lack of growth opportunities.

So what does this mean for associations and nonprofits?

PNP offers some tips on hiring:

  • Pay competitive salaries
  • Foster a positive workplace culture and environment
  • Cultivate opportunities for growth, training and professional development
  • Avoid a lengthy hiring process so “the good ones” don’t get away
  • Be clear about job responsibilities and rewards
  • Look for potential leadership capabilities in staff and new hires

All this said, here’s my two cents. My first job out of college was working for an association, from which I moved to another association. Neither was afraid to take a chance on a recent college graduate, and showed it by offering me competitive compensation and fun, inspiring work environments.

Both jobs (in the editorial and communications division) were incredible experiences, so I encourage you to tap into the newly graduated young professionals in your area.




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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