Archive for January, 2015

27
Jan
15

4 Event Metrics You Should Be Calculating

This month’s guest post is by Courtenay Allen, a marketing specialist at Attend.com, which produces event management software. It was originally posted on the attend.com blog.

Courtenay Allen

Courtenay Allen, marketing specialist for Attend.com.

You’ve set your event goals and planned every detail, but how do you know if you’ve been successful? The word “metrics” gets tossed around everywhere, but it’s more than just a buzzword – it’s a necessity. Whether you’re hosting a nonprofit fundraiser or an alumni event, here are standard metrics to calculate your event’s success.

Event Surveys
After your event is complete, sending a post-event survey is an important tool to determine the success of your event. Most likely, not all your attendees will complete the survey. However, even without 100 percent completion rate, the feedback you’ll receive will be invaluable. Most importantly, ask your attendees if they’re satisfied with your event and if they’d be willing to attend next year. If attendee satisfaction is low, it may be time to change or even eliminate the event all together. In addition to your attendees’ general feedback on their experiences, ask them for more in-depth insights about the food or venue. While these metrics don’t necessarily impact your return on investment for your event, they’re helpful to know and can help you plan future events.

Attendee Demographics
Another crucial element to measure is your attendees’ registration process. For instance, did they initially sign up for your event really early? Or right after you published a blog post? Perhaps they registered for your event after seeing your event promotional video. Not only is it important to track when, but also how your attendees registered through your various event promotions. Did your attendees register through social media or by responding to your email? By tracking your attendee registrations, you’ll be able to determine which messages and media were the most effective for your event audience.

Tracking your attendee demographics is more than just counting the number of attendees that registered – it’s also determining the number of qualified leads your event generated. These attendees have a budget and authority to make purchasing decisions. Calculate the cost per lead for your event by dividing the program cost by the number of qualified leads that attended. This measurement is helpful for projecting budget requirements future lead generation.

MetricsEffective and Efficient
To determine if your event was cost effective based on the number of attendees reached, divide your program cost by total attendees. This calculation is not recommended as a stand-alone figure, but should be used in conjunction with others. For instance, what was your event efficiency ratio? This metric is also known as the expense to revenue ratio. To calculate, divide the total expenses of an event by the total revenue that your event generated. If your expense in running the event is higher than the revenue, you’re looking at problems with efficiency.

Social Impact
During your event you were probably busy live tweeting to keep your attendees engaged. However, after your event is over, track your event hashtag retroactively for all your event conversations. In fact, check all your social media platforms to see the results of your social media increase after your event. Examine all your likes, tweets, comments and number of fans and followers, and determine which of your social media channels was most successful.

Depending on the type of event, you may want to calculate your press impact. How many media mentions did you receive, and which publications wrote about your event? By calculating the cost to reach those same audiences with paid advertising, you’ll be able to put a dollar figure with the media reach.

Measure and Conquer
Different types of events have different goals, and to determine how successful you were at those goals, you need event metrics. Whether you need all these or just a few, these metrics will give you the information you need to continue improving your events.

20
Jan
15

Learning plans for the New Year

January has nearly come and gone. It’s hard to believe. Just this week my chiropractor reminded me that 2015 is about 1/12 over. It seems like only yesterday I was gearing up for the hustle and bustle of the holidays: decorations, cards, presents, baking, parties and the like.

10888186_10102314760568285_1634678307_nAnd then New Year’s Eve passed us by in the blink of any eye, too. In fact, my friends and I caught the official countdown on TV just moments before midnight. I suppose that’s a testament to the good food, good conversation and good company.

But the twinkling lights and the glittery decorations are now safely packed away for another year. As I drive down the icy, snow-lined streets, dotted with discarded Christmas trees, it seems that the magic is indeed gone – at least temporarily.

As always, I spent some down time over the holidays contemplating my 2015 resolutions. Getting fit tops my list again this year (though my motivation is challenged by the early sunsets and the freezing temperatures), in addition to reconnecting with friends and family.

Also on my mind is the professional development of both my staff and me. I had the opportunity to participate in ATD’s Master Instructional Designer Program in December and I’ve already gained a new client as a result of that experience.

GoalAreasFor me, the power of intentionally setting goals (both big and small) to advance the success of an individual, team and organization should not be underestimated.

While goal setting often occurs during an annual performance appraisal, the start of a new calendar year also lends itself to reevaluating learning plans for the development of skills, competencies and content expertise. Otherwise, time passes (quickly) and you discover that little has been accomplished or achieved.

At Event Garde, in addition to professional development plans specific to each team member (focused on anything from CMP preparation to enhanced writing skills), we are committed to attending at least one webinar a month focused on the latest industry trends and research.

To determine what should comprise a learning plan for you or your team, consider the following three-step approach:

  1. Organizational Analysis
    1. What do we want to achieve as an organization?
  2. Performance Analysis
    1. How does individual performance tie in?
    2. What are the required performance levels for key tasks and competencies?
    3. What are the required knowledge and skills to be successful?
    4. What performance gaps exist?
  3. Learning Needs and Evaluation
    1. What training and possible alternatives will best support learners?
    2. How will we know if our learning is effective?

Examples of specific activities that might support these learning plans include mentoring, networking, training, education and project exploration. As always, establishing anticipated outcomes and target dates lends credibility and urgency to the process.

Following each learning activity, encourage the staff to identify key takeaways and how it will implement them on the job. Additionally, set aside time during staff meetings for the team to share its experiences for all to benefit. If appropriate, record highlights either digitally or physically for all to see and reference.

No matter where you start, be sure to take a fresh look this month at how both you and your team will learn and grow in the New Year. Don’t let another month pass you by without identifying learning needs and then establishing a plan to tackle them head-on.

06
Jan
15

Meetings mean money for hotels in 2015

RM_snip_hotel_sign_glassA new year means new professional development opportunities. Admittedly, I’m a PD nerd. So I’ve been excitedly surfing the web for all things writing, media relations and public relations.

But if I have to pick, I’m going to choose an event hosted in a hotel with comfy beds, free Wi-Fi, probably a restaurant….and the list goes on.

Thanks to PD nerds like me, in 2015 hotels should get a big financial boost. According to a new report by Social Tables, the meetings industry will hugely influence the profits of hotels.

First up: cybersecurity.

I touched on it last week in a post about MPI’s meetings forecast for 2015. But it’s worth repeating: Cybersecurity is becoming the No. 1 concern among professionals. Within the last few months, retail giants Target, Home Depot and Hobby Lobby have all experienced security hacks, resulting in the theft of customers’ financial information.

When businesses send their employees to a hotel for a conference, they also send crucial financial information – which they expect will be protected. And so, if venues want to attract clients, they’d better keep up with cybersecurity enhancements.

“The potential for valuable information to be hacked or stolen via insecure networks is a real threat,” said David Peckinpaugh, co-chair of Meetings Mean Business. “As such, cybersecurity at hotels will become increasingly important for events and meetings in 2015.”

In fact, according to the Social Tables report, it seems advanced technology will have the greatest effect on hotels and will be in great demand since Americans own, on average, four digital devices.

In addition to providing adequate Wi-Fi coverage, some hotels are experimenting with remote/mobile check in. Last year, Starwood Hotel and Resorts became the first chain to offer such a service, according to the Social Tables report. Think about the convenience for meeting planners: No more keys in packets.

Consumers are becoming more technologically savvy – and demanding – and hotels are following suit. In 2015, an increasing number of hotels will offer technological conveniences such as whiteboards, social media screens and mobile apps.

conference-preview-img“Meeting planners are becoming more and more creative in rewarding attendees who interact and use technology than ever before,” said Gene Hunt, director of event sales at the Grand Hyatt Washington. “They’re marrying concepts such as gamification with technology before, during and after meetings to develop program content – and it’s our responsibility to help them achieve maximum results on their investments in these technologies.”

Also listed in “9 Ways Meetings Will Impact Hotels in 2015”:

  • Virtual reality travel experiences
  • High occupancy rates (roughly 65 percent)
  • Measurable data on meetings and events

But I think most interesting in the report was brand expansion. As the economy improves in 2015, upper scale hotels will experience an uptick in occupancies for leisure travel, as more people can afford expensive accommodations.

Such a shift will most likely force event planners to seek out lower-priced hotels/chains for events, analysts predict.

“Couple this with the fact that over the next 20 years, the middle class will grow from 2 billion to 5 billion, and you have a powerful argument for the idea that an increased presence of affordable brands to accommodate the meeting needs of planners (affordable room blocks, meeting spaces and build-your-own meeting packages, etc.) will force diversification of hotel portfolios to include more affordably priced properties, and with them, more affordably priced meeting spaces,” the report said.

And so, hotels have a prime opportunity to attract budget-savvy meetings planners and a still precocious meetings industry.

What do you think? If a hotel employs you, we’d love to hear from you.

04
Jan
15

Bonus content: Event Garde e-news – January edition

Heidi Brumbach

Heidi Brumbach, CEO, Technisch Creative

Q & A with Heidi Brumbach, CEO, Technisch Creative

Q: New Year resolutions – Do you make them? Why or why not?
A: I try not to make the same old resolutions like “lose weight,” “get organized,” etc. If I make a New Year resolution, it has to be specific, the timing has to be right and the goal has to be realistic, as well as measurable.

Q: What do you consider to be the most valuable thing you own: when you were a child/teenager/now?
A: This might make me sound like a soccer mom (I’m not), but I absolutely love my Town and Country minivan. I love that you can hide the seats away and have an instant cargo van!

Q: If you could have had the starring role in one film already made, which movie would you pick?
A: I love having fun on the job, so when I think about how to answer this question, I don’t think of a character I want to play, but an experience I wish I could have been a part of. There are so many great stories about the making of “Caddy Shack.” I think that would have been the most fun movie project ever.

Q: You’ve just been hired to a promotions position at Kellogg Co. What would you put in a new breakfast cereal box as a gimmick?
A: I always used to like solving problems, like Ralphie with the decoder on “A Christmas Story.” I would probably go with some kind of time-consuming mystery or puzzle so kids would be distracted from their iPhones for a while. Maybe even something that forces human interaction.

Q: If you could play any musical instrument, what would it be and why?
A: I really love percussion. I played the drums in middle school, but gave it up to dance instead. I wish the show “Stomp” had been around at the time. I would have stuck with both!




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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