03
Jun
14

Engage volunteers, take a page from the magazine

“Busy.”

I suspect this is the four-letter word you last used in response to the question, “How are you?” And it’s probably not an exaggeration either. With impending deadlines at work, the various extracurricular activities of our children and our own attempts to maintain healthy lifestyles, there are countless commitments that draw down on our time.

And yet it’s incumbent upon each of us to acknowledge those who have helped us build extraordinary careers and give back to our respective professions in meaningful ways. Whether mentoring emerging professionals, serving on boards and committees or simply sharing with colleagues our best practices and lessons learned, every little bit helps.

Pictured with Bill Hamilton, president, Bill Hamilton Designs

Pictured with Bill Hamilton, president, Bill Hamilton Designs

Editorial Advisory Board

For the last year I’ve had the opportunity to serve on the editorial advisory board of Michigan Meetings + Events magazine. In some small way, my expertise and insights have helped shape a publication that serves as a resource to meeting and event planners and suppliers in our state.

And as a board member, it’s more than just a listing on the masthead of each issue. We attend board meetings to discuss details of the magazine—what we think works, what we think should be improved—and swap stories about the state of the industry.

We also vote for the magazine’s annual Hall of Fame inductees. Prior to that meeting, we nominate individuals in seven categories: Best Meeting Professional, Best Special Events Planner, Best Supplier, Up-and-Coming Meeting Professional, Up-and-Coming Special Events Planner, Up-and-Coming Supplier and Lifetime Achievement.

This year I was honored to nominate Katie Dudek, CMP as the up-and-coming meeting professional. By board vote, she was inducted into the 2014 Hall of Fame on May 29 during the annual Best Of Awards party. Dudek is a meetings manager for the Michigan Association of Certified Public Accountants in Troy – and she’s an exemplary role model for the meetings industry.

photoContent & Articles

As content and articles are developed for the magazine, I’ve also provided input on story ideas and recommended sources for specific stories. Additionally, I’ve written a column called The Meetings Coach for the last several issues. Following is a snapshot of the topics I’ve tackled:

But don’t take my word for it. If you’re not yet receiving Michigan Meetings + Events magazine, order your free subscription today. Similar publications are offered in California, Colorado, Illinois, Minnesota, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Texas, as well as two regional publications (i.e., Mountain and Northwest).

Each issue includes the most up-to-date, need-to-know local intelligence for meeting and event professionals (and those interested in these topics). The Summer 2014 issue was just released here in Michigan. And exciting topics are on the horizon for this fall, including a piece from yours truly on exhibitor success guides.

Lessons Learned

The real takeaway here is that associations could (and should) take a page from the magazine when it comes to volunteer engagement. Following are my 10 lessons learned having been a part of this experience for the last year:

  1. Volunteers appreciate limited commitments given their busy schedules.
  2. And those with more time on their hands enjoy opportunities to scale up their involvement.
  3. Stronger products are produced with the help of volunteer insights.
  4. Don’t underestimate the value of networking and the camaraderie that will grow among a group of volunteers.
  5. Be sure volunteer groups represent a good cross-section of your industry for optimal results.
  6. Busy work will not be well received; coordinate meaningful opportunities for volunteers to pay it forward.
  7. It’s best for volunteers to see and benefit from the fruits of their labor in a timely way.
  8. Recognition is always welcomed and appreciated.
  9. Loyal volunteers are often your organization’s best advocates.
  10. Volunteers like to talk; tight agendas and pre/post socials are your friend.

Tell us: How do you engage volunteers? Which of these lessons will you apply to your organization?


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meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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