Archive for the 'Marketing' Category

16
Dec
14

The makings of marketing mavens

Marketing_tomschaepperTwo years after graduating college, I entered the association world.

I served as director of communications for an association for four years – and I loved every minute of it. As all association professionals understand, resources were thin but job responsibilities were huge. I was all things communications, media relations and public relations.

But marketing? Not so much.

True, we launched our first official marketing campaign a couple years into the job. But with too few hours in the day and a never-ending list of priorities, marketing just wasn’t at the top of the list.

Fast forward 10 years, and I’m now a public relations professional who loves all things marketing. Today, we blur the lines between public relations and marketing, especially thanks to digital and social media. Yet, the mission is the same: Build your brand, your reputation and your credibility by engaging key audiences with specific (albeit simple) messaging.

And that takes an incredible amount of work and vision.

Associations are in a tough spot, forced to do more with less. So where does marketing fit in?

It often struggles to justify its existence, but associations seem to be embracing it as best as they can, according to a new report by Demand Metric Research Corp., a research and advisory firm serving the association industry.

The 2014 State of Digital Marketing in Associations benchmarking study was administered mid-October through mid-November, with membership associations holding the largest response rate. The median size was 1,001 to 5,000 members.

Marketing business salesKey findings:

  • Three-fourths of associations in this study report their marketing is somewhat to very effective. Eighty-eight percent think members perceive their marketing and communication efforts as sometimes to always relevant and professional.
  • For associations rating themselves most effective at marketing, strategy and planning is their most frequently cited capability. But for those that rate themselves least effective at marketing, strategy and planning is the fifth most-cited capability.
  • E-mail, event and content marketing are the top ranked tactics in terms of effectiveness.
  • Almost 90 percent of associations include an e-mail newsletter in their digital marketing portfolio, but only 41 percent use an e-mail preference center.
  • The ownership of marketing tasks – such as pricing, positioning, promotional channels, data analysis and technology spend – is fragmented, with a number of other association departments frequently owning these tasks.
  • In an increasingly technology-driven market, IT owns most of the technical skills marketing needs to succeed.
  • Only 13 percent of associations report not using any marketing metrics. For the 87 percent that are, most are using volume or activity metrics, such as click-through rates, which don’t provide true indicators of marketing’s contribution.

So, more than half of respondents reported that marketing strategy is important, and that they have the staff to design and implement such a strategy. But the key is to achieve buy-in: Marketing is an all-hands-on-deck approach. It shouldn’t just fall on the shoulders of the director of marketing and/or director of communications. Leaders should provide the vision; the board of directors should adopt it; and leadership should provide guidance to all staff. And all staff should operate with key messages in mind.

In the survey, respondents possessed three marketing capabilities: membership engagement strategies and campaigns; public relations; and membership retention and strategies.

But what about tactics?

Respondents ranked e-mail and event marketing as the top two marketing tactics, followed by social media, website/SEO and content marketing. But here’s the problem: Without content, there’s no marketing strategy. Content is the foundation from which to create all marketing strategies.

For example, e-mail newsletters and campaigns should be consistent with branding (the look and feel of the association).

The same goes with blogs. Although many associations aren’t blogging, blogs are crucial marketing tactics. They’re the perfect places to post content (content marketing). In addition, blogs are invaluable SEO tools.

Of course, marketing without analytics is useless. Google analytics are simple and effective, and associations should be using them. But the only two analytics most associations employ according to the study: click through and open rates.

“Marketing is simply too important to leave entirely in the hands of the marketing team,” the study’s authors wrote. “It is a function that must pervade the entire organization, guided by strong leadership that collaborates effectively with everyone, from the board and below.”

best-marketing-tacticsAs a marketing and public relations geek, I’m excited about the data this study provides. In summary, though, here are some takeaways, as listed in the report:

  • Strategic orientation. The most effective marketing functions in this study are those who prioritize strategy and planning. If your team feels like it’s too busy to take time out to plan and develop marketing strategy, then you’re opting for lower marketing effectiveness.
  • Embrace content. The content marketing effectiveness gap revealed in this study is huge. Most of the marketing tactics associations are using rely on some form of content as input. Learn how to develop and deploy content effectively.
  • The ownership and responsibility for some of the key marketing tasks is very fragmented. Much of this fragmentation would go away under strong, executive marketing leadership. Even without a marketing executive, associations can give their marketing teams a better chance by allowing them fuller ownership of the things for which they have, or should have, responsibility.
  • Marketing is increasingly a technical pursuit. Associations need to equip their marketing teams with the skills and training to function in the modern world of marketing.
  • Any use of marketing metrics and an analytics process is good, but even better is when that process uses metrics that do more than just report on activity levels. Association marketers need to identify metrics that truly indicate the value they create and then hold themselves accountable to them.

So what do you think? Is marketing part of the plan for 2015?

25
Nov
14

More than turkey and stuffing

thank you noteAnd so it begins.

Thanksgiving is upon us, and soon we’ll be spending the day with family and friends, gorging on our favorite foods, watching football and talking about our many blessings.

Yep. Thursday kicks off the holiday season.

So now what? Try starting with “thank you.”

“This is a great opportunity for organizations of all sizes to show their gratitude for customers,” said John Foley, CEO of interlinkONE and Grow Socially. “With so many businesses taking advantage of the holidays, it can be difficult to create a message that stands out. While many organizations offer sales and discounts during the holiday season, try using a slightly different approach to show appreciation.”

Foley produced a short video offering tips for effective holiday marketing. He suggests rather than promoting your business, promote your giveback efforts. Or, better yet, give some props to one of your clients or members. And social media is a perfect platform.

Foley also suggests sending Thanksgiving cards – not just Christmas cards – to your customers.

If you’re looking for more ideas, Help Scout provides an awesome list of 25 original ways to say thanks. Some ideas: handwritten thank you notes; customer appreciation events at a local coffee shop; surprise office lunches for members; social media love on Twitter and Facebook.

But it doesn’t end there.

volunteer2After Black Friday and Cyber Monday comes #GivingTuesday, a global day dedicated to giving back. This year, #GivingTuesday is Dec. 2. Just two years after launching, more than 10,000 organizations around the globe join forces to do good.

Efforts can be small or large. Coordinate a food drive. Make a financial contribution to a cause you support – and then ask a board member to match it. Host a day of service in your community.

And use social media. Use #GivingTuesday on Twitter to raise awareness. Retweet often. Ask your members to share their giveback efforts.

Whatever your organization does, make sure you communicate your efforts. Take photos and include them in your digital publications and post them on Facebook. Include short write-ups on your website. And most importantly, include information in your member communications.

Big or small, your efforts to say “thank you” and to give back reinforce that your organization cares about more than the bottom line. Your members will jump at the chance to belong to something inspirational, something larger than they can accomplish on their own.

“Letting your customers know you appreciate their business is the right thing to do, besides being good business sense,” wrote Ostari, an IT firm. “Telling your vendors you value them by saying ‘thank you’ is not just common politeness; it gives them a sense of worth to be appreciated, and it makes them try harder to give satisfaction. Show everyone you do business with they matter to you, and you reinforce a good relationship. Common courtesy is not common today, but it’s very much appreciated when it’s shown.”

And so, on behalf of Event Garde, thank you for your continued support. This year, Event Garde has reached some incredible milestones. Without you, we wouldn’t be here.

From the Event Garde team, Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours.

01
Jul
14

If Events Could Talk: 10 Strategies for Fueling a Powerful Voice

Content-AuditHas your association conducted a communication audit within the last three years? More specifically, are your meetings and publications teams working together to ensure your association’s events are effectively marketed?

If your events suffer from stagnant or declining attendance, sponsors or exhibitors – or if you have difficulty securing quality speakers – the answer lies not in a silo, but rather in your team. Following are 10 strategies your association can immediately implement to boost the reputation of its signature events and, in turn, its bottom line.

  1. Branding – A uniform event name, acronym or hashtag from one year to the next is just the beginning. To ensure your members easily recognize an event at first glance, consider how colors, logos, fonts and overall design elements are used consistently across communication platforms.
  2. Differentiation – Briefly scan the professional development landscape and you’ll find fierce competition all around you – colleges and universities, other associations and even your own members. Event messaging must clearly illustrate in both quantitative and qualitative terms how your event is different from the rest.
  3. Value proposition – Every event comprises some combination of learning and networking. One way to elevate yours above the others is to demonstrate the value attendees can expect to gain in both the short-term (e.g., contacts, ideas, goals, objectives) and the long-term (e.g., strategy, tactics, products, services, profit).
  4. Voice – If your event could talk, what would it sound like? An elderly grandparent? A progressive hipster? Ensure written collateral closely resembles the tone and sophistication of your audience. As appropriate, add in elements of levity, informality, slang and pop culture to also make them fun and interesting to read.
  5. Brevity – Promotional pieces are not the place to be long-winded. Prospective attendees are inundated with messaging each and every day, so make it easy for them to cut through the noise and connect with your publications. Don’t be surprised if fewer words result in improved open and click-through rates, too.
  6. Channels – Determine how your association communicates. And don’t just think in terms of print communications – include all digital and social media platforms, as well. Optimal event marketing is multimedia in nature and should include messaging in most – if not all – of these communication channels.
  7. Testimonials – Never underestimate the power of an exceptional experience, particularly by Generation Yelp. Gather and share both written and video testimonials from attendees, sponsors, exhibitors and speakers. Ultimately, it means more coming from their peers than it does from you.
  8. Images – We know a picture is worth a thousand words, so ditch the clipart and invest in a professional photographer to take pictures during your signature events. Use these photographs throughout your marketing materials to tell your event’s story: who attends, how they engage and what they learn.
  9. Sample content – Sometimes prospective attendees and their supervisors are looking for added insurance your event will be worth their time and money. Sharing sample content in the form of slide decks, handouts, executive summaries and video clips may be just the ticket to secure their participation.
  10. Volunteers – Identify your repeat attendees and arm them with the tools needed to promote your events. Consider guest blog posts, social media chats and featured magazine columns. Likewise, remove as many barriers as possible to encourage easy sharing of member-generated materials.

While you may not have the resources to employ each of these tactics between now and your next annual meeting, take some time this month to identify and address the low-hanging fruit. Then develop a long-term strategic plan for implementing the remaining marketing and communication ideas, remembering to include representation from both the meetings and publications teams.

At the end of the day, you simply can’t afford to ignore what your events are saying about you, your department and your organization.

28
Jan
14

On target and in the money

11272851-concept-success-red-dart-hitting-a-target-vector-signNow that you’ve settled into 2014 (maybe? sort of?), you’re probably planning an exciting lineup of events.

Maybe your goal is to attract as many participants, from as many demographics, as possible. After all, hundreds of attendees translate into thousands of dollars, and everyone loves a strong revenue stream. Right?

Not necessarily, according to Jeff Hurt, executive vice president, education and engagement, for Velvet Chainsaw Consulting.

“When you create education sessions for everyone about everything, you can’t go deep into the issues and challenges that your audience craves,” he said. “You miss the opportunity to create programming that participants feel was prepared just for them, and ultimately, your conference programming becomes generic. It’s vague and feels like wet, soft, mushy Melba toast.”

So instead, take a lesson from successful marketers. The golden rule of marketing is to identify your target audiences, which are the groups of people who are most interested in your product or services. They’re also the most engaged in your messaging and marketing efforts.

A good example: education tracks. Segmenting sessions into audiences – administrators, planners and vendors, for instance – allows you to cater to specific needs. So when another need arises, these grateful participants may turn to you for business, membership and additional educational opportunities.

At the same time, it’s a good idea to keep vendors’ interests in mind.

Hurt said some associations with significant tradeshows make 60 to 70 percent of their revenue from exhibit booth sales, while another 10 to 20 percent of revenue comes from sponsorships and advertising. According to Hurt, usually exhibitors want: qualified leads; face-to-face time with purchasers, decision makers and budget officers; and the opportunity to bond with current clients.

Jeff Hurt

Jeff Hurt, executive vice president, education and engagement, for Velvet Chainsaw Consulting. Photo courtesy of Jeff Hurt.

“If you see your conference audience as a homogenous, faceless clump of people, you’ll have a hard time selling them as the right audience for your exhibitors and sponsors,” he said. “Instead, think of them as a long line of individuals waiting to have a conversation with you. Do you want to talk to every one of them? Or do you want to seek out the individuals who have the authority and responsibility to purchase products and services for their organizations?”

In short, target audiences at conferences and expos should comprise those groups that are most important to your exhibitors and sponsors. Once you determine those audiences, focus on their needs when developing educational content and choosing speakers.

In other words: You’ll generate the most revenue when you determine which customers will have the greatest impact on your exhibitors and sponsors.

A little market research will go a long way when planning your conferences and events, so for starters, pick up a good marketing book to learn more about target audiences.

Make sense? How do you meet the needs of your target audiences?

07
Jan
14

Snow day productivity: Briefer, clearer, funner communications

First, I’d like to take this opportunity to wish you a very happy, healthy and prosperous 2014. Both Kristen and I, together with the Event Garde team, appreciate you following our blog, sharing your comments and post ideas and paying forward those posts that resonate with you most.

snow-day-games-425a-102909This week the combination of snowfall and bitterly cold temperatures delayed back-to-school and back-to-work activities for many in the Northeast. For some, that means a snow day (or two) home with the kids. For others, it means a roaring fire, a cup of hot chocolate and a “Judge Judy” marathon on the television.

And for still others, it means a time to catch up, organize and reflect.

It’s in these moments of reflection I’m reminded that in 2014 we must be briefer and clearer. Forget the top 10 lists and the crystal ball predictions. Forget even the larger-than-life New Year’s resolutions. This year I’m recommending in your communications with members that you simply emphasize brevity and clarity.

So what does that look like?

It means sending fewer communications (electronic and print) that are consistently branded in both look and tone. It also means scaling back those we do choose to send (e.g., limiting our conference brochures, marketing prospectuses and even our one-page letters to only the most pertinent information).

Likewise, I’m advocating for clearer communications. And by this I simply mean identifying and promoting only key messages in our communications with members. When we become too verbose or attempt to share too much information, we often muck up the waters and turn off our audience.

Every couple of months, as I write my column for Michigan Meetings + Events magazine, I have the opportunity to practice this very same exercise. I must routinely edit down a draft of 1,000 or more words to just 400. Ultimately, though, the result is briefer and clearer – and thus more useful and interesting to readers.

wiifmThink about it: As the lines between our personal and professional lives continue to blur, there’s certainly no excess of time or attention as it relates to consuming our various collateral pieces. So if we intend to be briefer and clearer this year, we must think more like a member and less like staff (i.e., What’s in it for me?).

Finally, as someone who often wears the marketing hat by default, allow me to boldly recommend being funner in 2014. Before crucifying me for my use of this non-word, I’ve used it here to illustrate the following point: Have fun, occasionally break from the style guide and use an authentic voice that’s relatable and engaging.

Used together, I’m certain the briefer-clearer-funner approach will increase open rates and readership across your various communications. And, ultimately, this will snowball into engagement, attendance, membership and other success metrics identified by your organization.

Tell us in the comments what you discovered in your moments of reflection this snow day. How might your organization employ the briefer-clearer-funner approach this year?

19
Nov
13

A Tuesday ‘thank you’

GivingTuesdayEditor’s Note: As Thanksgiving approaches, we all start thinking about our blessings. So it seemed appropriate to dedicate this week’s blog post – and probably next week’s – to the topic of saying “thank you.” For next week, I’d like to write about how you thank your customers and/or give back to your community. So please drop me a quick note at Kristen@eventgarde.com!

But for now, one way to give back and say thanks: #GivingTuesday. This week’s guest blog post is from Kate Olsen, vice president of strategic projects for Network for Good, a technology platform that facilitates online fundraising and giveback opportunities. She tells us how your association/organization can participate in #GivingTuesday.

For more information, check out the #GivingTuesday Facebook page and the Twitter feed and use #GivingTuesday and @GivingTues.

Kate Olsen

Kate Olsen, vice president of strategic projects for Network for Good.

#GivingTuesday occurs on Dec. 3 this year and is an opportunity for companies, nonprofits and individuals alike to get involved for the greater good.

For those not in the know, #GivingTuesday is a campaign to add a national day of giving to the lineup of shopping days Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday. It’s a prime opportunity for nonprofits and companies (and individuals) to collaborate for the greater good. Here are four steps to ensure your partnership’s success.

1.  Seek mission and values alignment.

There are many reasons to form cross-sector partnerships: promotion to a bigger audience, inspiration from new ideas and approaches and access to additional skills, more resources and knowledge. And there are also just as many reasons not to partner: Support can come with strings attached, lack of trust, conflicting goals and mission creep.

To ensure you create a winning partnership, take the time to make sure there’s a good fit between your mission and the corporate partner’s brand identity and goals.

Luna’s Pure Prevention campaign provides a great example of nonprofit-corporate alignment. As a provider of nutrition for active women, Luna teamed up with the Breast Cancer Fund to find and eliminate environmental and preventable causes of breast cancer—a major health issue for women. It just makes sense.

2. Leverage complementary assets.

Assets are any resources that you and your corporate partner bring to the table. In addition to funding, assets can include people, skills, audience reach, relationships and technology.

A partnership is not just about getting access to corporate philanthropic dollars: It’s about true collaboration. Think about what assets your nonprofit has that will be of value to a corporate partner, and vice versa.

You have invested in a brand, program portfolio, supporter base and other resources that will help make the partnership a success. Never discount what you bring to the table.

3. Design the right partnership architecture.

Thinking through the goals of the partnership and designing a measurable campaign will help ensure transparency and focus, especially if you use those measurements to tell stories with impact. How can you engage supporters in relevant and meaningful ways? How will you measure their participation and communicate results?

One framework to help structure the partnership is the ladder of engagement. Offer your audience multiple ways to participate with your partnership based on their level of passion and commitment to the cause.

The No Kid Hungry campaign, led by Share Our Strength, does a great job of offering multiple ways to take action: donate, advocate, sign a pledge, spread the word and raise money for your cause.

How can you offer a ladder of engagement for #GivingTuesday? First, understand where your supporters congregate online; then design calls to action that leverage those channels. Here are a few ideas:

  • #GivingTuesday Twitter chat (Encourage corporate sponsors to pledge $1 per tweet.)
  • Random Acts of Kindness Facebook campaign (Have supporters share acts they performed or  witnessed.)
  • Inspirational generosity pins on Pinterest (Have supporters share what generosity means to them.)
  • Kind deeds caught in the act on Instagram (Feature photos of generous acts and giving.)
  • Messages of hope and generosity on YouTube (Feature testimonials about how giving affected their lives.)

Network for Good 4. Measure and communicate accomplishments.

Evolving a partnership requires taking the time to understand where you’ve been, what you’ve accomplished and how you can keep improving. Communicating impact to partnership stakeholders is a vital piece of that process. It’s also important to communicate that to your donors, and never forget to say thank you!

If you need inspiration, just check out the A Day Made Better thank you video for a refresher on powerful storytelling and expressing gratitude. You can also see how Phoenix House recapped its 2012 #GivingTuesday campaign and closed the loop for campaign participants with a heartfelt response from program beneficiaries.

Remember: Corporate-cause partnerships are all about relationships, collaboration, execution and impact (and fun!).

05
Nov
13

Stop spamming your members

internet_abuse_spamI’ve had the good fortune to work for and with associations my entire professional career. So it’s fair to say I understand and value association membership. That’s why I’m a card-carrying member of several professional societies. And while I join these organizations for very specific reasons (with very specific goals and outcomes in mind), it’s clear to me that at least one of them has no idea who I am.

Most of us have at least two email accounts that we check on a fairly regular basis, each receiving dozens (if not hundreds) of emails a day. That’s a lot to read and process. Recently, among a flurry of other emails (some important and some not) I received a communication inviting me to sponsor an upcoming event. There were a number of issues, however, with this specific ask:

  1. My consulting practice doesn’t align with the vendor categories they’re seeking for this event.
  2. The language that was used to describe sponsor ROI was both vague and unremarkable.
  3. The event topic is not relevant to my company’s mission.
  4. The list of sponsorship opportunities were presented as a menu rather than as a customized recommendation within my budget capabilities.
  5. Some of the benefits (e.g., complimentary registrations) were unusable given my company’s size limitations.

What it comes down to is this: the opportunity was not vetted for me. Unfortunately, this is not uncommon for this particular association. But I believe that similar practices occur in our organizations on a daily basis, as well. While we don’t intend to spam our members, these emails—poorly disguised as member outreach and relationship-building—are nothing more than disruptive commercial messages.

Every couple of days I receive similarly ineffective communications that do not align with my company’s goals and objectives. Is this because two years ago I crossed the aisle from association staff to industry partner?  Is the assumption that I’m hoarding bags of money like Ebenezer Scrooge? More importantly, is this the way we treat our suppliers – like bottomless piggy banks?

Or do association staff have a similar experience, replacing sponsorship inquiries with countless invitations to attend the latest and greatest professional development conferences that don’t align with their interest areas?

Assuming we can all agree this is a problem, let’s reflect for a moment on the solution. What can you do today to ensure you’re not spamming your members? Following are just a sampling of ideas:

  • Have a volunteer read and comment on major solicitation communications before they’re distributed.
  • Slow down and don’t just get something out for the sake of checking an item off your to-do list.
  • Mass customize your emails and other communications – gather more data about your members either in person or by survey and ensure they’re receiving opportunities that align with their individual needs and interests.
  • Deliberately schedule emails internally to ensure members are receiving only a certain number of communications a day/week/month.
  • Always include an opt-out option when sending mass emails.
  • Add a staff person to the distribution list to ensure quality control; this person should monitor communications with the member experience in mind and raise any concerns to improve future practice.
  • Know the preferred delivery methods of your members and send communications in that way, even if this means sending fewer pieces in several different formats.
  • Write compelling communications that clearly spell out your value proposition and give both members and sponsors the information they need to make informed decisions.
  • Strike a careful balance when crafting communications between professional and playful; use a voice that appeals to your target audience and fits the intended goals and objectives of the message.
  • Avoid faux personalization (e.g., masquerading an email with a mail merged name block as a personalized email). If the body of the email is too generic it will only undermine your message and the organization’s integrity.
  • Don’t underestimate the power of brevity.
  • Demonstrate ROI with post-event surveys, satisfaction/reach statistics and personal testimonials.

The bottom line is this: stop spamming your members. They’ll thank you for it. They only have so much time, money and patience – and would rather receive a few, hand-selected opportunities than every single communication your organization writes. It demonstrates you understand the uniqueness of each organization and increases your likelihood of a sale.

And, for the record, this goes for just about everything. My example specifically references sponsorship opportunities; however, we could just as easily have been talking about conference registrations. So, my question to you is this: Are you spamming your members? What policies have you instituted to stop or curtail this practice? What other effective marketing techniques might you add to this list?




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, hot yoga, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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