Archive for the 'Leadership' Category

29
Dec
15

Connecting for Maximum Event Success

View More: http://pinupbyginger.pass.us/anne-bonneys-final-edits

Anne Bonney

This month’s guest blog post is by Anne Bonney. She is a John Maxwell Team certified speaker, trainer and coach specializing in leadership and empowerment topics. Bonney has spent the last 20 years bringing this to leadership and educational roles with companies including Under Armour, Les Mills International, Town Sports International and The New England Aquarium. 

Thanks to Bonney for submitting her post! If you have a guest post to share, please send it to kristen@eventgarde.com.

Managing and executing events is a tough job – one you can’t do alone. Event planners have to rely on the help of vendors, staff and sometimes volunteers to make an event successful. If everyone is on the same page, and they respect your leadership, an event runs like clockwork and it’s a beautiful thing! Everyone wants that…so how can you be that kind of leader?

  • PROVIDE ALL THE INFORMATION: Create a template for your vendors, staff and volunteers that has all relevant information. Have others on your staff take a look at it to be sure it’s thorough. Try to create a standard template that you can use for each event.
  • PROVIDE ROLE CLARITY: Assigning roles and making sure everyone knows their area of responsibility prior to the event will allow you to supervise the whole event while your staffers manage each moving part.
    • Volunteers: Nothing is worse than showing up to volunteer and having nothing to do! Be sure that whomever is coordinating the volunteers has clear instructions and can give your volunteers all information before and during the event so they’re confident they had a positive effect on the success of the event.
    • Staff: Everyone should have a clear job. They should know what they’re doing, why and what it’s going to look like when they’re successful.
      • Assign captains so there’s one go-to person for each functional area of the event (registration, sponsors, AV and stage, food, talent, etc.). Once you’ve done that, and you’ve given the information and tools they need to be successful, empower them by letting them do their job!
    • ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES: Get in there when things get hairy. If things aren’t going as planned, be sure help get things back on track. When your staff and volunteers see you rolling up your sleeves and busting your butt too, they’re likely to work even harder for you.
    • LEARN PEOPLE’S NAMES: People love to hear their names, and when the busy person in charge of a large event remembers their names, it has a huge impact. There are tons of techniques to help you remember names. It will make a HUGE difference in people’s commitment to your event.
    • THANK EVERYONE: Without them, you’d be sunk, so tell people how much you appreciate their part in making the event successful. If you have the budget for a small gesture, even better, but a simple, well-timed “thank you, you’re making a difference” will go a long way in their commitment to you now, and how much they’re willing to help you in the future.

If you can do these things, your team will function like a well-oiled machine. And this will leave you free to deal with unforeseen challenges and create a team that’s energized and excited to be a part of your events.

Event Garde is a professional development consulting firm that employs a versatile skill set and a wealth of experience to create well-connected leaders. We’re committed to lifelong learning, for ourselves and for our clients, believing in its ability to produce transformational experiences that advance innovation. Sharing our deep knowledge, we’re dedicated to performance improvement for the professionals we serve and those who attend the events we facilitate.

 

31
Aug
15

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news – September edition

Cora Geujen

Cora Geujen, director of event planning, Renaissance Esmeralda Resort and Spa

Q & A with Cora Geujen, director of event planning, Renaissance Esmeralda Resort and Spa

Q: If you could live someone else’s life for a day, who would it be, and why?
A: Princess Catharine’s, of course. For the hair and wardrobe.

Q: What’s your spirit animal, and why?
A: The first animal that popped into my mind was a tigress; I’m fierce when needed, protective of my team and always in the background to keep informed of what’s going on with my team. But of course I had to take an Internet quiz and it turns out I identify with the butterfly, with a secondary connection to the tiger. Go figure.

Q: Chocolate, strawberry or vanilla ice cream, and why?
A: Chocolate with a side of mint chips. Because I’m fresh.

Q: Which adjectives best describe you?
A: Snarky…

Q: If you could eat only one food for a week, what would it be, and why?
A: My mother’s Thanksgiving stuffing. It tastes like family and transports me back to my childhood.

03
May
15

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news May edition

Bonnifer BallardQ & A with Bonnifer Ballard, executive director, Michigan Section, American Water Works Association

Q: If you could have any question answered, what would it be?
A: I like that we don’t have all the answers. I like the process of discovery. But if I could choose to read just one answer from the “back of the book,” the one thing I would ask is, “Is time travel possible?”

Q: If you could have one wish, what would it be?
A: Wow, this is tough. So much to wish for! I guess if I only had one, it would be that everyone on the planet has a safe place to live and not be hungry. What a different world it would be!

 Q: If you could invite four famous people to dinner, who would you choose and why?
Albert Einstein, Maya Angelou, Eleanor Roosevelt and Neil deGrasse Tyson. What amazing conversation we could have!

Q: If you could learn any skill, what would it be?
A: There is still so much I need to learn. And I like learning new things. So those that are really important to me are already on the list. However, the one skill that seems to elude me consistently is the use of tools. Power tools, manual tools, it doesn’t matter; I just don’t seem to have the knack for hitting a nail on the head, drilling a screw into wood or turning a bolt. It’s a struggle every time I pick up a tool. My brain understands but my hands don’t follow. It’s very frustrating.

Q: If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you live?
A: I like living in Michigan. We just moved back last year after living in Chicago for 15 years and I’m loving it. I guess if I could move my family with me, and money were no object, I would choose a beach with warm water, cool nights, no mosquitoes and no hurricanes or tsunamis. Is there such a place?

31
Mar
15

Nonprofits and associations are hiring…even in a candidate’s market

Now hiringWe’re nearing college commencement season. In about six to eight weeks, excited college graduates around the country will don their caps and gowns, ready to hit the workforce with enthusiasm and a bit of trepidation.

And so, once again, we’re reading a lot about hiring – and in some cases, lack thereof.

But there’s good news for graduates and jobseekers in general: Associations and nonprofits are hiring.

According to a recent report by Professionals for Nonprofits, nearly 60 percent of nonprofits increased their staff size in 2014 and 55 percent plan to add staff this year. And, with demand exceeding supply, salaries are on the rise.

In fact, 70 percent of the organizations reported two to 10 vacancies in their organizations. As for hiring priorities, fundraising and membership tied at No. 1, with marketing and communications taking the No. 2 slot, followed by technology.

“In a major shift from 2014-2015, our survey results show that it has become a candidate’s market, increasing the challenge for nonprofit managers to find and hire the staff they need and to pay the higher salaries required,” the report says.

And demographics are shifting. Gen X – those born from 1965 to 1981 – still make up most of the workforce. After a few years under their belt, these employees are ready for leadership positions. That opens the door for Gen Y staffers – those 32 years old or younger – who now comprise half the workforce, as reported in the study.

Gen hiresWith the shift comes changing expectations and skill sets. Gen Y is ripe with entrepreneurial spirit, independence and technologically-savvy minds. They know they’ve got the leg up, which means hiring has become more difficult for nonprofits, the report found. Job seekers can afford to be a bit more selective. Not surprisingly, the top reason for turning down a job offer was compensation. The second reason? A perceived lack of growth opportunities.

So what does this mean for associations and nonprofits?

PNP offers some tips on hiring:

  • Pay competitive salaries
  • Foster a positive workplace culture and environment
  • Cultivate opportunities for growth, training and professional development
  • Avoid a lengthy hiring process so “the good ones” don’t get away
  • Be clear about job responsibilities and rewards
  • Look for potential leadership capabilities in staff and new hires

All this said, here’s my two cents. My first job out of college was working for an association, from which I moved to another association. Neither was afraid to take a chance on a recent college graduate, and showed it by offering me competitive compensation and fun, inspiring work environments.

Both jobs (in the editorial and communications division) were incredible experiences, so I encourage you to tap into the newly graduated young professionals in your area.

04
Jan
15

Bonus content: Event Garde e-news – January edition

Heidi Brumbach

Heidi Brumbach, CEO, Technisch Creative

Q & A with Heidi Brumbach, CEO, Technisch Creative

Q: New Year resolutions – Do you make them? Why or why not?
A: I try not to make the same old resolutions like “lose weight,” “get organized,” etc. If I make a New Year resolution, it has to be specific, the timing has to be right and the goal has to be realistic, as well as measurable.

Q: What do you consider to be the most valuable thing you own: when you were a child/teenager/now?
A: This might make me sound like a soccer mom (I’m not), but I absolutely love my Town and Country minivan. I love that you can hide the seats away and have an instant cargo van!

Q: If you could have had the starring role in one film already made, which movie would you pick?
A: I love having fun on the job, so when I think about how to answer this question, I don’t think of a character I want to play, but an experience I wish I could have been a part of. There are so many great stories about the making of “Caddy Shack.” I think that would have been the most fun movie project ever.

Q: You’ve just been hired to a promotions position at Kellogg Co. What would you put in a new breakfast cereal box as a gimmick?
A: I always used to like solving problems, like Ralphie with the decoder on “A Christmas Story.” I would probably go with some kind of time-consuming mystery or puzzle so kids would be distracted from their iPhones for a while. Maybe even something that forces human interaction.

Q: If you could play any musical instrument, what would it be and why?
A: I really love percussion. I played the drums in middle school, but gave it up to dance instead. I wish the show “Stomp” had been around at the time. I would have stuck with both!

23
Dec
14

Lessons in leadership from 2014

This guest blog post by Mark Athitakis, a contributing editor for Associations Now, originally ran Dec. 22 on Associations Now. Athitakis has written on nonprofits, the arts and leadership for a variety of publications. He is a coauthor of The Dumbest Moments in Business History. You can follow him on Twitter at @MarkANMag.

Mark Athitakis, a contributing editor for Associations Now.

Mark Athitakis, a contributing editor for Associations Now.

So, what did we learn in 2014?

Part of me wants to say: Not as much as one would hope. Boards remain dysfunctional. Associations often are still slow-moving ships, particularly when it comes to globalization. Diversity remains a challenge. However, I don’t want to close out 2014 with a resounding “Bah! Humbug!”

Throughout the year I’ve spoken with plenty of association leaders, staffers and experts who are doing meaningful and path breaking work; look throughout AssociationsNow.com and you’ll see my colleagues have done the same.

So take the five lessons-learned below not as a lecture about how leaders have fallen short, but as reminders that there’s always work to be done; this list only reflects where I figure that work is most needed.

It’s never difficult to find a CEO who will bemoan his or her board in private, or do it under cover of an anonymous survey.

Globalization is less of a might-do and more of a must-do. In 2014 the ASAE Foundation released research revealing that many U.S.-based associations are still struggling to expand their reach overseas. (More research is to come in 2015.) As sticky wickets go at associations, this is one of the stickiest, but it’s also among the most promising in terms of financial growth — and, even if you’d prefer to focus on mission more than money, it’s where the future members and users of your services are, particularly in the Middle East. This needn’t be an overwhelming task — even focusing on a couple of products can move the needle.

Disengaged boards are a killer. Boards are too nice to the CEO. They’re neglectful. They don’t do enough to help a new CEO settle into the gig. It’s never difficult to find a CEO who will bemoan his or her board in private, or do it under cover of an anonymous survey. And I do worry, as I wrote back in May, that social-media herd mentality might trickle down into leadership, leading to groupthink. But for the moment, I’m looking at the bright side: There are plenty of associations doing smart work assembling and educating their boards to do meaningful strategic work in the midst of these challenges.

Man-ListeningListening is an underrated leadership skill. I tend to gravitate to this particular leadership theme without explicitly trying to; it just seems that so many shortcomings with CEOs boil down to errors of miscommunication and failures to listen. If an exec isn’t listening to what his or her staffers are saying, he won’t have a sense of what their ambitions are, won’t be able to capably review their progress and will struggle to keep them on board when challenges arrive. Listening is the easiest skill to pay lip service to, and perhaps the most difficult to master.

Diversity starts with you. Without question, associations have made great progress in recent years in making their staffs and boards more diverse. But the seemingly popular instinct at addressing the issue — to create a task force or diversity committee — can risk echoing the marginalization it was meant to eradicate. Executives need to own diversity as a core competency as much as membership and revenue — all the Lean In circles in the world won’t mean much if the guys at the top aren’t getting the message and boards won’t evolve unless they’re mindful of where they’re underrepresented.

The big organizations don’t have this figured out any better than anybody else. Corporate America is often carted out as a better model for associations, particularly when it comes to generating revenue — it’s the tacit message delivered whenever somebody says, “Our association needs to run more like a business.” True enough, corporate execs get all the attention from magazine covers (well, almost all). But you didn’t have to try hard to find executives in the corporate world struggle to stay on point as much as anybody else. I gingerly suggested in March that perhaps GM was on the right path in responding to its cars’ ignition-switch problems; the months that followed have only made a fool of me. Apple’s board structure was much celebrated, but I think there are more interesting governance questions than board size. And even large nonprofits can have a leadership crisis when the executive steps into contentious territory. Case studies from the big guns can have some meaningful lessons to deliver, but ultimately the approach that works is going to be the product of what you’ve learned from what you’ve observed in your own organization.

05
Aug
14

When your gut speaks, listen

vp_gut_feeling_signAs a mom, I’ve learned to recognize that feeling. You know, that feeling in your gut that something isn’t quite right. The kids are too quiet. Maybe a sleepover when my kid seems sluggish (and later gets sick) isn’t a good idea. After 12 years of practice, I’ve finally learned to listen to my gut.

So why is that so hard to do in the workplace? Because as a parent, I’m not faced with mounds of data, mission statements and internal politics.

I’ve written before about the importance of data. They can be powerful decision-making tools. Business executives love data, and expect their managers to analyze it to make sound business decisions – but not all the time, according to a new survey.

In June, Fortune Knowledge Group, which publishes Fortune, conducted a survey of business leaders to learn more about their decision-making habits, measuring the influence of cultural, emotional and situational factors in business decisions.

“Business decision-makers want to feel something positive,” said Christoph Becker, CEO and COO of gyro, a global advertising agency that partnered with Fortune Knowledge Group for the study. “After all, the choices made at work are the choices made in life; there is no separation. Work risks are personal risks. While hard facts inform our decisions, we are ultimately influenced by emotion and won over through our hearts, not data.”

More than 720 U.S.-based senior executives participated in the survey, all of whom directly influence business operations. About 80 percent of the companies represented in the survey have annual revenues of $500 million or more, while 41 percent reported revenues of $10 billion or more.

In short: A majority of the executives said they trust their guts when making decisions, and human emotion should trump data. Specifically, they indicated positive emotions – ambition, motivation and admiration – are stronger than negative ones.

When choosing business partners, executives said they value corporate culture and reputation above data. They suggested companies can make themselves more attractive by establishing a reputation for strong and open management practices, especially respect for employees, management credibility among employees and employee pride in association with the company.

In addition, 71 percent of executives reported they’re willing to make short-term financial sacrifices to build long-term relationships. Those relationships, executives said, should be based on trust. Interestingly, 42 percent said they’d rather do business with a company whose employees have “good interpersonal skills and emotional insight rather than analytical intelligence.”

201401-omag-instincts-1-600x411“Despite having more information than ever upon which to make decisions, executives still rely heavily on human factors when making most business decisions,” the researchers wrote. “Business decision-makers are, of course, using data to their benefit. However, especially when selecting business partners, executives are ultimately less analytical and more emotional.”

Later this summer, gyro will release complete results of the study. But for now, the take-home for associations should be that sometimes, your inner voice should speak louder than sales figures.

So when you’re building vendor relationships, investigate the company a bit. Are employees happy? What’s the company culture?

Don’t underestimate the importance of emotional intelligence.




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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