Archive for the 'Innovation' Category

30
Jun
15

Bonus content – Event Garde e-news – July edition

Allison McClintick

Allison McClintick, CEO/leader development specialist, FlightLead Consulting

Q & A with Allison McClintick, CEO/leader development specialist, FlightLead Consulting

Q: Would you rather sky dive, bungee jump or climb to the top of the Golden Gate Bridge, and why?
A: If the goal is to put myself into cardiac arrest, I would say all three! All those choices seem equally terrifying because I am totally not OK with being in the air like that! I would rather check out all the sacred Native American sites in America or camp in Yellowstone or tour all of America’s national parks! When it comes to adventure, I am a “feet on the ground” girl!

Q: It’s almost 4th of July! Which type of firework best represents your life?
A: I am split on this one. A very real part of me would be best represented by an M-80 – you know the ones that just go off and sound like a bomb? I can be very aggressive, loud and startling! The other part of me would love to be represented by a colorful sparkler – long-lasting, non-threatening and fun to hold and run around with!

Q: If you could live your life as an animal, what would you be, and why?
A: I would be very curious to live out my life as a dolphin. These animals are wicked smart and I feel there is a whole world of mystery and magic down there that we don’t know about. Their language is so complex – scientists say they may have even more evolved intuition and emotional intelligence than humans. That would be incredible! And because I feel like two totally different people in my life, I would not hate being on a wild horse in the 1800s Wild West. How amazing would that be?

Q: Again… it’s almost a holiday, so what’s your favorite picnic food?
A: The only reason why I don’t eat certain picnic foods is because they are usually awful for you. But everyone knows that calories don’t count on a holiday, so bring it!

Q: If I were writing a book about your life, what would the title be, and why?
A: Oh, this is easy. “Rebel With a Cause.” I am a serious pain in the neck. I have never done things the way people expect; I have always fought against conformity in its many manifestations; and I feel pretty comfortable with what I was put here to do. I don’t intentionally set out to be a rebel, but it has always worked out that way! Only took me 39 years to figure out how to make it work out for me!

23
Jun
15

Us vs. them

member_engagement_retentionWe hear it all the time: We live in a “me” society. Most of us, at some point, have asked, “What’s in this for me?

Associations aren’t any different. Think about it: How many associations want to boost revenue by hoping their members buy more? How many times have we wished we could just get more volunteers?

In other words, we ask, “How can we get our members to do what we want them to do?”

Newsflash: It’s not about us. It’s about them.

“Unfortunately, while we’ve been busily building and marketing the programs, products and services we think our audiences might like, the world has changed,” write Elizabeth Weaver Engel, CEO & chief strategist, Spark Consulting LLC, and Anna Caraveli, managing partner, The Demand Networks LLC, in their new whitepaper. “In 2015, customers are looking for more than a transaction; they’re looking for custom solutions that can be constructed only through authentic relationships of the type, duration and intensity they—not you—want.

Focusing on member engagement, Engel and Caraveli provide some guidance for associations to transform their thinking: Instead of defining engagement as what they value, associations should be asking how they can help their members accomplish their goals.

Here are some “what-ifs” for associations to consider:

  • What if, instead of membership and product sales, our goal was to enable members to achieve the outcomes that matter most to them?
  • What if, instead of looking inward to try to build the perfect product, we looked outward to our audiences, interacting with them to understand their needs and experiences?
  • What if, instead of viewing members as passive consumers of our benefits and programs, we worked with them as co-developers of the value our associations provide?
  • What if, we gave up control and encouraged our audiences to define the terms of their own involvement with us

And yes, sometimes this means competition.

Elizabeth Engel, CEO and chief strategist for Spark Consulting, LLC.

Elizabeth Engel, CEO and chief strategist for Spark Consulting, LLC.

The key is to figure out how your association, better than other organizations, can truly engage members and potential members. Thanks to 24-7 access to information, simply being experts in a field won’t cut it anymore. Your members can find information anytime, anywhere, with a click of mouse.

So how do associations compete? They should use their networks to build engaging communities and to listen to their members’ collective voice to learn what really matters, the whitepaper suggests. Associations should ask: What do our members really want to succeed? What are the needs and issues we can help address?

“Adopting the outside-in approach to engagement means your sole goal is to create value for members,” Engel and Caraveli said. “Everything else (program categories, mix of benefits, organizational structure) can be questioned, transformed or even eliminated as long as doing so solves your audiences’ problems and creates value that engages them.”

Some tips:

  • Ask people to contribute. Don’t just create products, events and resources you think people want. Instead, engage your members’ skill sets. Ask them to help create value.
  • Work toward providing your members’ goals – not your own. Get rid of the things that aren’t working and instead focus on those that are. The most engaged members are those who feel you truly care about their personal and professional development.
  • Include everyone, from every department, in your engagement strategy. It shouldn’t just be the job of the membership department. This means breaking down internal silos. It’s important for everyone to work as a team, rather than people looking out for themselves. Sometimes this means getting rid of the fat.
  • Act – don’t just talk. If you ask for members’ feedback, truly mean it. Be willing to make suggested changes. Remember: It’s not about sales; it’s about your members’ success.

It’s not easy, and it may require an entire shift of focus. Simply put: Associations may have to dump the old and bring in the new.

Anna Caraveli

Anna Caraveli, managing partner, The Demand Networks, LLC

But it’s worth it.

“Properly understood, engagement is nothing more or less than the development of real relationships with our members and other audiences,” Engel and Careveli wrote. “Authentic relationships take time to develop, involve increasing commitment on both sides, require us continually to be learning more about each other and are focused on helping each other achieve important goals. Through the process of developing genuine relationships, associations become necessary partners in helping our audiences achieve their most important goals, and we achieve our goals—to be financially healthy, vital, growing, mission-driven organizations—as a result.”

12
May
15

Left brain vs. right brain: Which wins the event planning game?

Brain hemispheres sketchSo apparently I’m right brained. At least according to this test.

I guess that’s not surprising considering I’m a writer. But I’m also extremely detail-oriented and analyze everything, so I think I’m a good mix. Yeah. I’ll go with that.

While most people think with mostly their left side or mostly their right side, it’s crucial to have a bit of both.

And so, I encourage you to take the aforementioned into account after reading this sentence: New research by London and Partners, the official convention bureau of London, and MICEBOOK.com indicates that event planners aren’t as creative as they thought.

Yep. Research suggests the event management industry is filled with left-brained thinkers.

Samantha Whitehorne recently wrote an enlightening Associations Now blog post on the research. And I encourage you fellow right-brain thinkers to get a chuckle from it.

For the study, more than 400 event planners had their brains analyzed to see if they’re more “rationale left brained” or “emotional right brained” thinkers. And while most felt they performed their jobs creatively, only 39 percent were indeed considered creative thinkers.

Maybe that’s because, according to the study, only 34 percent of respondents said they’re given time to think out of the box and only 32 percent said creativity is rewarded. Furthermore, more than half of the respondents said the budget just didn’t support risk taking.

2000px-Rubik's_cube.svg“Ours is an industry within which logic and in-depth planning are absolutely critical to successful outcomes,” said Tracy Halliwell, director of business tourism and major events at London and Partners. “Creativity and innovation are growing ever more important as clients demand event activations that set them apart from their competitors and deliver enduring memories for consumers. The experience itself is now what drives the event, but it’s only by combining pioneering ideas with concrete solutions that we can truly surprise and delight.”

So what does the right brain vs. left brain debate mean for event planning?

Here’s a good summary from Cathy Key in a recent Event Manager blog post:

Left-brained people tend to be detail oriented and thrive on data. So event ROI is important. Also, they don’t like to take risks, so most likely, they’ll create a road map for events.

In contrast, right-brain thinkers bring to the table a flare for ingenuity and creativity. They look at the big picture and thrive on feedback and emotion to measure success. Event ROI is less important to right-brain people, who are willing to trust their gut instinct.

“While we need the analysis and fact-finding powers of the left brain, when it comes to motivating our team, ourselves and our attendees, we need right-brain thinking,” Key wrote. “We need to have an emotional connection to our events if we are going to really enjoy our work. When we are connected to WHY we are involved with an event, working late nights and pulling out all the stops is natural. Without the WHY all you have is hard work.”

Another way to look at it: The left side of the brain sets the goals and the right side finds the purpose.

creativity2But a good event planner needs to think with both sides of the brain. While creativity reaps huge rewards, we need left-brain thinkers to keep us in check. And so, event management teams should comprise both types of thinkers.

“While time constraints and restricted budgets can sometimes hinder creativity, a balance is always needed between the creative and the logical,” said Chetan Shah, founder and CEO of MICEBOOK.com. “Great teams bring together a mix of personalities, approaches to work and creative or logical attributes. Whether someone is left or right-brained, their attributes and strengths should be encouraged and nurtured to ensure their events are spectacular, both rationally and emotionally.”

Take the test and let us know. Are you left- or right-brained?

31
Mar
15

Bonus Content – Event Garde e-news – April edition

Jeff Hurt

Jeff Hurt, executive vice president, education and engagement, for Velvet Chainsaw Consulting. Photo courtesy of Jeff Hurt.

Q & A with Jeff Hurt, Executive Vice President, Education and Engagement, Velvet Chainsaw Consulting

Q: It’s a Saturday night. What would we most likely find you doing?
A: Catching up on a favorite series like “House of Cards,” “Orange Is The New Black,” “Scandal” or “How To Get Away With Murder” before I go out with a few friends for a quick dinner.

Q: If you had to title a book that best sums up your life, what would it be?
A: “From The Mixed Up Files of Windomere Ave.”

Q: What’s the one thing you couldn’t live without, and why?
A: Family and friends. We are wired to connect and I need their support, love and hugs often. I travel so much and give so much of my life away that I return home tired and emotionally drained. I need people surrounding me who will love and support me, even with all my cracks and imperfections.

Q: It’s a beautiful summer day and you’re relaxing in the park. Who do you hope sits next to you on the park bench, and why?
A: A total stranger who is willing to share something amazing and beautiful from his or her life.

Q: Tell us a little known fact about you – what makes you, you.
A: My waters run deep and I’m an introvert who has learned to be extroverted when needed. That being said, I spent four months as a rock and roll roadie running audio visual and sound for an unknown regional band.

01
Mar
15

Bonus content: Event Garde e-news – March edition

Q & A with Peggy Hoffman, President, Mariner Management and Marketing

 A tribute to the Academy Awards!

Peggy Hoffman

Peggy Hoffman, president of Mariner Management and Marketing, LLC

Q: If you had to walk the Red Carpet, what would your dress look like?
A: I’m a classic type and my best features are my legs and arms. So my selection would be either a classically sexy black dress, either short or long, with two side slits. Add an interesting off-the-shoulder sweetheart neckline to show off an incredible onyx, ruby and diamond necklace.

Q: The award for the “Best ____ ” goes to Peggy Hoffman.
A: Wow, this one is tough because I’m not generally going for one best thing but a best package. I’d like to shine as a friend, listener, supporter. The best compliment I ever got was my son saying to another,  “My mom is strong.”

Q: In your thank you speech, whom would you thank, and why?
A: The list is long – really – because I’ve gained so much from so many different people, largely because people see me in so many different lights. The list would start with two people: my husband, Peter, and my Mom, Louise. It would definitely include my three sons and two dance mentors, two athletic mentors, two awesome friends and two sisters. (Wow! Sounds like I’m filling an ark!)

Q: Now, let’s pretend you were at the awards show in Hollywood. Which actor or actress would you most like to meet that night?
A: There isn’t one who comes immediately to mind and that’s largely because I have this nagging doubt that none would live up to my opinion of them as an artist. But, I’d like to think that Carol Burnett might come close – so let’s say Carol.

Q: Favorite movie (regardless of whether it won on Oscar), and why?
A: So I’m approaching this question based on whether I can watch it over and over again … you know, when you’re on the treadmill and it’s the movie playing on AMC or the free movie channel. The answer then is a tie between “Italian Job” (a 2003 heist film directed by Gary Gray and starring Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Jason Statham and Edward Norton) and “True Lies” (1994 action film directed by James Cameron starring Arnold Schwarzenegger and Jamie Lee Curtis). For the record, neither are Oscar-worthy, but hey, they make being on the treadmill a delight!

10
Feb
15

Our screwed up thinking about creating conference experiences

This month’s guest blog post is by Jeff Hurt, executive vice president of education and engagement for Velvet Chainsaw Consulting. It was originally posted on Jan. 28.

Jeff Hurt

Jeff Hurt, executive vice president, education and engagement, for Velvet Chainsaw Consulting. Photo courtesy of Jeff Hurt.

As conference organizers, we need to learn about the power of experience.

Well, we already know about experiences. We have them all the time.

We’ve had experiences with our families and friends. We’ve had experiences with work. We’ve had school experiences. We’ve had experiences with institutions and organizations. We’ve had vacation experiences.

Unfortunately, we’ve made some very faulty assumptions from our own experiences. And we’ve even institutionalized some defective planning processes based on those experiences and what serves us best in our practice. Not what serves our paying attendees best.

For instance, we assume that if we secure experts to tell attendees what to believe, attendees will believe it.

Then we expect that attendees will adopt the experts’ beliefs as their own. Thus, those beliefs result in actions that lead to positive results. So attendees leave our conferences changed for the good.

All attendees have to do is register, pay, show up, sit quietly and listen. The rest occurs like a magical mental assembly line.

But that’s not how it works! At all! Ever! I mean infinity-ever!

The truth about experiences

Our experiences actually form our beliefs.

Our beliefs form our actions.

Our actions create results.

Our family experiences shape our beliefs about family. Our school experiences shape our beliefs about education. Our relationships form our experiences about friendship and love.

Our own past experiences shape how we plan and create conferences. We bring our beliefs from our experiences with other institutions into our conference planning process.

Our own beliefs of what a conference should look and feel like actually limit our ability to create authentic, engaging new experiences. And in doing so, we have created experiences that now frame how our attendees view conferences.

rear-view-mirrorLooking back to move forward

We need to explore why attendees, exhibitors, sponsors, volunteer leaders, conference planning teams and conference hosts feel the way they do about conferences.

We’ve got to understand how we got where we are today.

It’s only in looking back that we can move forward. Then we can point to where we need to change directions. Then we can create new archetypes for exemplary experiences.

At its core, conferences are about people. Regular conference attendees perceive other conference attendees through interactions at the conference. The power of experience reveals a lot.

Turning nostalgic down conference lane

Let’s take a nostalgic mental journey down conference lane.

Visualize yourself walking down a traditional city street lined with various buildings. Each structure houses a different institution.

What do you see? Which of these buildings might be the perfect metaphor to describe your conference?

  • The Theater
  • The Boarding School
  • The Rigorous Academic Ivy League University
  • The Library Of Yesteryear
  • The Police Department
  • The Mayor’s Office
  • The Funeral Home
  • The Quaint Archaic Museum
  • The Political Action Committee
  • The Courthouse
  • The Church Or Synagogue
  • The Sports Stadium
  • The Department Store
  • The Local Bar And Pool Hall
  • The Mall

What type of city building best describes your current conference experience? What type of metaphor would you like to describe your future conference experience?
Editor’s Note: We encourage you to visit the original blog post to leave your comments to Jeff’s post!

04
Jan
15

Bonus content: Event Garde e-news – January edition

Heidi Brumbach

Heidi Brumbach, CEO, Technisch Creative

Q & A with Heidi Brumbach, CEO, Technisch Creative

Q: New Year resolutions – Do you make them? Why or why not?
A: I try not to make the same old resolutions like “lose weight,” “get organized,” etc. If I make a New Year resolution, it has to be specific, the timing has to be right and the goal has to be realistic, as well as measurable.

Q: What do you consider to be the most valuable thing you own: when you were a child/teenager/now?
A: This might make me sound like a soccer mom (I’m not), but I absolutely love my Town and Country minivan. I love that you can hide the seats away and have an instant cargo van!

Q: If you could have had the starring role in one film already made, which movie would you pick?
A: I love having fun on the job, so when I think about how to answer this question, I don’t think of a character I want to play, but an experience I wish I could have been a part of. There are so many great stories about the making of “Caddy Shack.” I think that would have been the most fun movie project ever.

Q: You’ve just been hired to a promotions position at Kellogg Co. What would you put in a new breakfast cereal box as a gimmick?
A: I always used to like solving problems, like Ralphie with the decoder on “A Christmas Story.” I would probably go with some kind of time-consuming mystery or puzzle so kids would be distracted from their iPhones for a while. Maybe even something that forces human interaction.

Q: If you could play any musical instrument, what would it be and why?
A: I really love percussion. I played the drums in middle school, but gave it up to dance instead. I wish the show “Stomp” had been around at the time. I would have stuck with both!




meet aaron

Association learning strategist & meetings coach. Founder & president of Event Garde. Passionate about cooking, running, blogging, old homes, unclehood & pet parenting (thanks to Lillie the pup).

meet kristen

Writer, editor, public relations professional. Digital content manager. Proud mom of three. Total word geek. Spartan for life.

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